Of Sir Walter Scott [1771-1832] | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, history, night / low-light, people, photography, structures

Scotland’s Image-Maker. 


Following on from my last two posts from Abbotsford House, I feel it’s only right to share some frames of the man himself – insofar as it can be possible given the passage of time. At Abbotsford, a striking bust of Scott stands at the head of the room as one exits his study from where he wrote much of his work. As for the Playmobil character – I have no idea as to why it was even there but felt it humourous enough to simply leave it there. In hindsight, I think I should have moved it away before making that shot – still, I like it enough. But by far my favourite of the two shared here, is this first frame – of Scott and his Deerhound, Maida, both relaxing beneath the Sir Walter Scott Monument on Princes Street, in Edinburgh. That this utterly astounding and beautifully ornate monument happens almost certainly to be my favourite structure to have ever even seen, let alone photographed (yes, you may have seen it feature once or twice in much older posts, here) is no coincidence. In any case, I do hope you’ll enjoy these frames.

R.

*
I | Scott & Maida Beneath His Monument, Princes Street, Edinburgh | 1/25th – f5.6 – ISO:3200 – 28mm – LTFS Full-Spectrum.

35chronicle.306 (1)

*
II | Bust of Scott w/Life-size Playmobil Character, Abbotsford House, Melrose | 1/80th – f5.6 – ISO:3200 – 50mm – LTFS Full-Spectrum.

35chronicle.306 (2)

*
III | The Head of the Room, Abbottsford House | 1/40th – f4.0 – ISO:3200 – 24mm – VIS

35chronicle.306 (3)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Abbotsford House, Melrose | 720nm Series: PT.II/II | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, history, infrared, rural, structures

A Few More Takes: A National Monument.


*
IV| 1/540th – f7.5 – ISO:200 – 35mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.305 (2)

*
V | 1/110th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 24mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.305 (3)

*
I | 1/380th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 24mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.305 (1)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Abbotsford House, Melrose | 720nm Series: PT.I/II | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, history, infrared, people, photography, rural, structures

Great Scott!


*
I | 1/350th – f7.5 – ISO:200 – 35mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.304 (1)

*
II | 1/270th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 24mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.304 (2)

*

There is a special ‘something’ about the Scottish Borders when the sun is even only half out. From home, it takes barely and hour and a half to get there and so, at the beginning of this month we planned a whistle-stop visit with an overnight stay on the outskirts of Melrose; I had a few places on my list – two of which, my lenses would be extremely interested in! The first was here, at Abbotsford House; the famous home of the infinitely more famous late Sir Walter Scott – poet, novelist, playwright, historian, antiquarian, judge (to name just a few of his accolades, that is). It can be said that Scott can be largely held responsible for Scotland’s national and international identity;  there’ll be no argument from me on that one.

Though it is now a visitor attraction should not take away from the fact that Abbotsford is of huge historical importance to Scotland and, it is more a monument than a house. Not only this, it is also utterly breath-taking; outside and in. The restrictions still placed upon us by Covid however, meant that during our visit to Abbotsford – there was a blessings and a curse. The obvious blessing was the reduced amount of visitors as a result of lengthy timeslots between admissions; this meant a great deal to me personally because as with any time that I visit a place of interest, I always prefer to capture without the obvious element of tourism and favour making frames which concentrate solely (inasmuch as can ever be possible) upon my subject, without avoidable distractions within the frame itself. Conscious exclusion is a big part of how I prefer to compose and so this was indeed a welcome blessing. As for the curse – most of the interior of the house (in fact all, above the ground floor) was inaccessible by visitors and so, we were constrained to a very few rooms downstairs. This is not to say that what remains on view to the public is not of interest. I have seldom witnessed or enjoyed such eclecticism or marvelled at such broad tastes and collections. Though I am sure curators had a difficult time of putting everything together (it is impossible to know and even more difficult to conceive as to whether the house’ interiors have been preserved in their ‘natural’ state – yet, I doubt it very much given the huge passage of time since Scott’s death in 1832) – it is both wondrous and romantic to spend time taking it all in. Though I have never read his works, I really do feel that I should. I do feel a niggle in my side, edging me towards a few more books for my Kindle!

For now, here are my first few chosen infrared exteriors taken at Abbotsford House and, I can only hope that they bring even a little, light-hearted enjoyment. As always, thank you so much for reading!

R.
*
III | 1/380th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 24mm – 720nm IR | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72

35chronicle.304 (3)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Mono-Archives: PT.XIV | The Draw of ‘Sleepy-Hollow’ | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, infrared, photography, rural, skies, structures, summer, trees, waterscape

The Mill on the Fleet: 720nm Infrared.


In July this year, I made another visit to one of my favourite stop-offs and, I am surprised that I hadn’t shared a couple of frames from my last jaunt to Gatehouse’s Mill on the Fleet sooner than this. The last time I had actually posted from The Mill was almost a year ago and so, I am happy to put this right, today. Though a popular and often a busy small town, Gatehouse offers some absolutely stunning scenery and, beautiful walks right from its heart; and none more tranquil or evocative than the views from the bridge, alongside the old mill. A perfect day for some alternative wavelength photography, such as it was – what else could I have done? The light and the clouds played right into my hands and, I have seldom seen this view look quite so haunting, or breath-taking. 

Thank you, as always for stopping by my pages and, I do hope you’ll enjoy these two frames from one of my all-time favourite spots. 

R.

*
I | The Mill | 1/310th – f6.0 – ISO:200 – 28mm – 720nm IR

35chronicle.303 (2)

*
II | The Mill on the Fleet | 1/190th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 24mm – 720nm IR

35chronicle.303 (1)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Closer Stills: PT.XXXI | Barnacles on Razor Shell

28mm, black & white, close-up, fine art, macro, nature, photography

On Perfect Imperfections?


It’s hard to believe (for me, anyway) that it has been over a year since I shot or posted any serious macro shots here. It may also be difficult to believe that macro is one of my favourite genres of photography and has fascinated me ever since I first picked up a serious camera. Many years ago I would have had so much macro gear and I’d made good use of it all too; but the longer I have been shooting, the less gear I want and, the more use I want to get out of the much less that I have. I have even started, over the last few years, to stop craving perfection (insomuch as I have been able to obtain it. Was it ever so, though? Probably not.) With all this mind, I have a number of macro and close-up options open to me but when I am shooting under controlled conditions (in my purpose-made cupboard under the stairs!) I still prefer to reach for my old Ricoh GRD IV. Desk tripod, a couple of clamps and desk lights, ISO:80, self-timer and a cuppa – sorted. Oh, and black & white of course. Who needs colour when form and texture can slap one in the face like this? Speaking of old, if you’re interested (and this is the case for all my work) – I don’t care much for updating my software when I can see results that I absolutely love with an eight year old version of LR (yup, I’m still on 4.4). So, old cameras, old software (old brain?) who cares? I still love this caper! 

Subject: The razor shell was something I picked up from Prestatyn beach when we were in North Wales for our holibags; I wrapped it in a napkin, stuffed it in my camera bag and once I left it in my studio on our return home, I promptly forgot about it. With an hour to kill this morning, I thought it was time I set it up for a shoot. It’s not particularly pretty but I love it anyway. So, just for fun, here’s an old shell, shot with an old camera and processed on comparatively ancient software. I hope you’ll enjoy! 

R.

*
I | 1″ – f9.0 – ISO:80 – 28mm – Spot Metred – EV -0.7

35chronocle.302 (1)

*
II | 1/6th” – f5.6 – ISO:80 – 28mm – Spot Metred – EV -1.0

35chronocle.302 (2)

*
III | 1/2″ – f8.0 – ISO:80 – 28mm – Spot Metred – EV -1.0

35chronocle.302 (3)

*
IV | 1″ – f8.0 – ISO:80 – 28mm – Spot Metred – EV -1.0

35chronocle.302 (4)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Gwrych Castle: PTII/II | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, history, photography, ruins, rural, structures

The Real in Surreal.


*
IV | 1/270th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 85mm – Matrix

35chronicle.301 (1)

*
V | 1/750th – f8.0 – ISO:200 – 50mm – Matrix

35chronicle.301 (2)

*
VI | 1/500th – f6.0 – ISO:200 – 35mm – Spot

35chronicle.301 (3)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.