London Skylines: PT.III | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, boats, cityscapes, fine art, full-spectrum, photography, skies, structures, urban, waterscape

Silver Linings?


It’s been a little while longer than I prefer, since I last posted and, if you’re visiting again – I thank you! In short, after keeping ourselves busy during the holidays, we have returned to find ourselves rather the worse for wear despite double-vaccinations, social distancing, constant mask-wearing and the collective use of more than likely a half gallon of hand-gel. It seems that the easing of restrictions and the predictable mass complacency that was bound to ensue, has had rather a negative impact on the dreaded lurgy and, after almost two years of this thing – working in close quarters within the health sector, I had to wait to until I had a holiday to succumb to it. To say I’m a bit miffed is an understatement. As I am currently on isolation day four of ten, I find only today that I have any strength to even post, so I hope I can make it worth your time. Whilst I have been able to get busy editing frames from other summer excursions, stringing words together with any coherence has been a distant priority until now. Is it possible to be cheerful and pissed off at the same time? There’s a contrast I don’t consider often.

Speaking of contrast, as a black and white shooter – I look for it everywhere. It’s one of the most important anchors of black and white photography, along with good composition and exposure, texture, light-play and if you’re really good (or just fortunate) some kind of message. In the latter, I lack often – my Achilles Heel, I guess. Nonetheless, I hope you’ll enjoy these few frames from London, where, I have to say – the clouds really played ball! Perhaps slightly over-exposed in #3 but I like it enough to share it with you, too.

I hope that you are all remaining safe and well, and if you’re not, you have my profound acknowledgement and sympathy. Covid sucks. Isolation sucks. Photography Rules!

Every cloud?!

*
V | The Dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral (& a Smoke-Break on the Steps) – from an Uber on the Thames | 720nm IR

35chronicle.289 (2)

*
VI | Blackfriars Bridge & the Boomerang (One Blackfriars), Southwark – from the Millennium Bridge | LTFS

35chronicle.289 (1)

*
VII | The Shard & the Belfast – & Some Naughty Clouds! | LTFS

35chronicle.289 (3)

*
– Memento Vivere! – 
R.
*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

London Skylines: PT.II | 35Chronicle Photography

28mm, 35mm, black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, landscape, photography, skies, structures, urban

Above & Below.


III | OXO [LTFS] – From the Thames.

35chronicle.287 (2)

*
IV | Westminster Bridge, Houses of Parliament & Elizabeth Tower in Scaffolding [720nm IR] – From the Eye.

35chronicle.287 (1)

*
– Memento Vivere! – 
R.
*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

London Skylines: PT.I | 35Chronicle Photography

35mm, black & white, cityscapes, fine art, full-spectrum, photography, structures

Mini-Breaks?


During a recent three-day excursion to London, a trip made a tad tricky by poor weather, even flooding and by the fact that I was back on crutches again after I managed to break a bone in my foot while tripping over the dog some weeks back, I was still able to capture some shots of the city that I am very happy with. Stopping every so often to release my hands in order to grab a camera and scout my frames before capture was, I think, a little frustrating for my family who had to keep waiting for me to do my thing, but, they came through in fine style in accepting the fact that I wasn’t going to be missing opportunities to record this incredible place. Though I am far more of a country boy both in my heart and in my upbringing, I can still appreciate the bustle, the enormity and the complete mixtures of styles and ages of, well, everything you could possibly find, here. 

Though I will be posting some of my favourites over the coming weeks, there will be no particular order of preference or theme. London is a place where things change completely from one street to the next. Any themes would, I think, work against its eclecticism and so, I hope you’ll enjoy whatever is to come. Even I don’t know yet.

Thank you so much for reading and, to new followers, welcome! Have a great weekend! 

*
I | Skyline, from an Uber on the Thames | LTFS.

35chronicle.286 (1)

*
II | Skyline & the O2 Arena, from 90m Cable Car, North Greenwich to Royal Victoria | LTFS

35chronicle.286 (2)

*
– Memento Vivere! – 
R.
*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

A Playful Intermission | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, close-up, fine art, full-spectrum, personal, photography, portraits

Paper, String & Tin-Foil…


A little break from castles and ruins, today. I mean, I would hate to be completely predictable!?

We had been talking about perhaps finding a moggie for a year or so, on and off, as it happens. For my part, I wasn’t as forthcoming in the locating of said moggie as was a certain Bumble and this was in very large part to the fact that, as a big guy – I am also very soft on cats. I’ve had many over the years, loved each and every one of them and I can’t remember more than one or two that I lost to natural causes and those heart-breaking memories have kept me from rushing in again; that really was the long and short of it. But in April, along came an eight week old Boomer, and a few weeks later, in May – a pair of absolutely beautiful sisters to keep him company, too. In all honesty, I am a firm believer of the fact that a cat (or three) absolutely makes a home, and it is wonderful to have them here in ours – and to enjoy the utter happiness (along with the obvious and frequent little trials, too) that they bring, every day. And most nights. Nonetheless – though they have only been in their new home for a short time, they have all settled in perfectly, and Summer, the cloud-fluffy, gorgeous one who would surely be the personification of, say, Audrey Hepburn – is laying on my legs even as I write. Boomer (the Ginger Ninja) and Penny-Pitstop (Beryl the Peril) are curled up together on their window cushion behind me – no doubt whispering outlines for new, devilish plots to each other. Or perhaps I have too much time to think, today. 

*
I | A Baby Ginger Ninja | Sigma DP3M LTFS

35chronicle.278 (1)

*
II | Penny-Pitstop Upon Realising She’s Been Well & Truly Caught… | GXR A16 LTFS

35chronicle.278 (3)

*
III | Boomer & Summer [Too Many Captions!] | GXR A16 LTFS

35chronicle.278 (2)

*

I’ll get back to my usual posts soon enough but, in the meantime – I wish you all a very playful, cute and fluffy Sunday! 

Memento Vivere…
R.
*

HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Eleven Arches: PT.II | 850nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, landscape, photography, rural, skies, structures

Kinclair Viaduct, Pinmore – Revisited.


Just about three years ago (give or take a month) I first shot the amazing, grand, utterly imposing viaduct just south of Pinmore on the Newton Stewart to Girvan road. I had to check my files from back then, some of which I posted in No.30, to recall which cameras I took with me on that shoot. Made on my old GR and X100T cameras, I came away with some very pleasing black and white images caught on a less than perfect day for contrast and I also recall that even the sky was so flat and diffused that the resulting frames rendered it featureless. But, I had travelled a very long way in order to shoot this iconic structure and vowed always, to go back. Maybe, I’d give it my IR treatment next time? Alright, so that was a rhetorical question!

*
I | Kinclair Viaduct | 850nm IR | 24mm | 1/125th – f8 – ISO:400

35chronicle.274 (1)

*

Of course I always intended to do that, so when the sun came out yesterday, Bumble and I headed off, westwards towards the A714, and north-west of Newton. In fairness, we’d been planning it for a couple of days (it’s not prudent to put any faith in the weather forecast anywhere in Scotland, more than forty-eight hours in advance; any of you who live here or have visited for more than a day, will understand exactly what I’m talking about!) When it came to the shots I’d make – I had thought to shift up from 720nm and decided that 850nm would give me a little more contrast under good light. I’d need that extra light to keep my film speed down and my shutter speeds up negating my need for the three-legged thing. As you can see from the frames here, I got very lucky with the light. One pair of frames in particular (No.I in this post and No.VI to come in the following share) did have us scrabbling upwards through tricky dense foliage in order to get the height and length I needed to grab the shot I had always imagined I would take on my first visit – a few minor abdominal wounds today remind me that the climb was well worth it and without that little extra effort, I would have come away knowing that the shot was there for the taking and I did nothing to get it – but it’s here, and the wounds will heal. Please do click the link to my original post and compare, because I truly believe that from the ground, these are the best IR shots I could possibly have made on any day such as this.

*
II | Two of Eleven | 850nm | 24mm | 1/125th – f8 – ISO:911 (!)

35chronicle.274 (2)

*
Dedications:

To my long-suffering and ever encouraging, Bumble – I thank you for getting into my scrapes for the sake of art! What else can I say? To all of you who visit and revisit my pages, click, comment and get involved – thank you all so much. The best that I can hope is that you will enjoy some of these captures – enough to come back. I utterly love what I do and take none of it for granted; and so – I keep doing it with the same passion and love that I felt when I first discovered what was even possible. To my good friend, Amar – your creations still help me make some of my most pleasing and dramatic work and in this regard, words fail me. Thank you, my friend! 

*
III | Woodburn Cottage | 850nm IR | 35mm | 1/80th – f6.3 – ISO:200

35chronicle.274 (3)

*

Until PT.II – I do hope you’ll enjoy these few frames and, I wish you all a very happy and healthy weekend ahead.

R.

[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Front Mounted 850nm IR Filter]


HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Corbelly Hill Convent, Dumfries: PT.III | 720nm IR | 35Chronicle Photography

28mm, 35mm, 50mm, black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, photography, ruins, structures, urban

One Last Look Around.


*
VII.

35chronicle.271 (1)

*
VIII.

35chronicle.271 (2)

*
IX.

35chronicle.271 (4)

*
X.

35chronicle.271 (3)

*
[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Corbelly Hill Convent, Dumfries: PT.I | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, history, infrared, photography, ruins, structures, trees, urban

All Roads Lead to… Roam?!?


Content Warning: This post contains elements of sarcasm, arrogance and common-sense, which some readers may find either offensive, or rib-tickling – depending on your sense of humour!

I may or may not be about to start on a little ‘Rob-rant’; in fact – perhaps I’ll just roll my eyes at this point and take a deep breath instead. Yes, that may be a better thing to do. You see, the one question I get asked a lot when I am out shooting old buildings, ruins, lighthouses, you name ’em – is, “Can I help you?” You may have read my thoughts about this question during one of my posts where I published a few frames of the beautiful lighthouse at Corsewall [PT.I – here] back in December, last year. It grates me every time – and it shouldn’t. 

*
I

35chronicle.269 (2)

*

I have been meaning to come here to the old convent at Corbelly Hill for around six months. Waiting for a clear day with good sunlight and plenty of time has been the only reason it has taken me so long to get up here, to what is the highest building in Dumfries. Known as St. Benedict’s, and also – Corbelly Hall Convent, it was commissioned in 1881 for the Nuns of the Perpetual Adoration and, was completed in 1884. In its time, it has also been used as a girls’ school, a makeshift Sheriff Court and even a museum. It has lain empty and semi-derelict for a good many years now, though. In 2003, it was used in the filming of Peter Mullan’s film “The Magdalene Sisters” – set in 1964 onwards, about the cruel abuse of women at a convent in Ireland. Though I would dearly have loved to have spent some time shooting inside the buildings, as some have before me – it was not to be. 

*
II

35chronicle.269 (3)

*

One utterly fabulous thing about Scotland is the right to roam and so, seeing no signage indicating otherwise either, Bumble and I took the walk up the hill from Maxwell Street, enjoying the clearest of views over the town on the way up and, we had a little scout around the outside of this beautiful building with a view to setting up for some fitting frames. The light was just about perfect by midday and it almost took my breath away with the sheer size of this place. As we walked around towards the main entrance, we noticed two police vans, a builder’s van and, a couple of cars. Old vinyl 45s from the 70s were strewn curiously and chaotically across the lawns. A broken window to the left of the main entrance door. Not a person in sight though. We picked up a few of the vinyls and read their labels – each one a 70s chart-hit and not a true dud among them if I’m honest. As we wandered the grounds, I began to capture a few shots. That’s when a short and stocky, builder-chappy – surly of face and postured with intent, walked towards us with his faithful right-hand man… to his left. “Can I help you?” he asked. I smiled gently, trying to not smile my facetious smile at the one question that presents to me every time as a red rag to a proverbial bull. “I’m not sure.” I politely replied. “How much do you know about infrared photography?” This precipitated a stunned silence and a quizzical expression in the gentleman who, once he had remembered why he had asked the question in the first place, told us that there had been a break-in that morning and he was concerned as, he had just acquired the building for himself. “Fair enough, but as you can see – you’re unlikely to get any trouble from us. Would it be okay if we carry on around and get a few more frames before the gates go in?” We were graciously (okay, a little facetious there, I know!) granted the freedom to roam once more; our attire possibly an obvious indication that we were not at all dressed for a raid on this day and were safe to be let loose. Yet, every which way we turned from that moment on, we were followed at a distance of no more than ten paces by the builder-chappy and three others of his crew; every word Bumble and I shared from that moment on, was not private. We contained ourselves to the awe of this place and reigned in our feelings about what had just happened. 

*
III

35chronicle.269 (1)

*

For around four or five days after I made these frames I was confined to being back at work and so, I literally have only just got around to edits today and, having finished working on this series, I really do have the pleasure of sharing a number of shots with you, which, I sincerely do hope you will enjoy. One more day and I’ll be back in the jug again… so who knows, I may get a few more up tomorrow, too? 

Thank you again for reading and I do hope that you’re getting set for a wonderful weekend. 

R.

This post is thoughtfully dedicated to all owners of derelict land and property who needlessly fear the evil intentions of the middle-classes who walk hand in hand, wielding small cameras.

Fear not – we’re only making pictures!

[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Old, Secluded Stone | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, full-spectrum, photography, ruins, rural, structures

The Temple of Cally Woods.


This one was another rare find… and again, I can’t take any credit! What can I say? Bumble finds ’em and I shoot ’em!

In 1779, a landscape gardener by the name of James Ramsay built this beautiful gothic ‘temple’ from which, at the time, fantastic views over Gatehouse and the open parkland of the Cally Estate could be breathtakingly enjoyed. Now, it stands hidden within the Cally Woods, a stone’s throw from the A75 yet, invisible from it. Surprisingly, however, it was found to be a mere two-minutes walk from a side-road – barely visible through the trees until we we almost upon it. Some work had been undertaken in around 2005 to restore this building and this was evident in some very obvious modern materials and techniques used, but its aura matches its era – and offered a very enjoyable half-hour for one particular gent. Oddly, its main facia and entrance to the south is identical to the west face, albeit that the doorway and windows on the west side are bricked up now. It seems a little odd and I wonder if Ramsay had changed his mind while building it or, perhaps, was it altered at some time in its future? One William Todd was a known resident here, for ten years, whilst he was in charge of drove cattle belonging to James Murray. I can’t imagine how cosy this place would have been with the open fire roaring. Of course, it would have had a roof, back then! 

I hope you’ll enjoy these few grabs and, thank you again for reading.

R.

*
I | To the Trees [Ricoh GR III – VIS] | ISO:1600

35chronicle.258 (1)

*
II | The South Entrance [Ricoh GR III – VIS] | ISO: 800

35chronicle.258 (2)

*
III | The West Wall [Ricoh GR III- VIS] | ISO: 640

35chronicle.258 (3)

*
IV | The South Entrance [Ricoh GXR – LTFS] | ISO: 673[!]

35chronicle.258 (4)

*
V | Roofless [Ricoh GXR – LTFS] | ISO: 2810[!]
35chronicle.258 (5)
*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

GETTING OUT [AHEM!] – LESS | PT.II | 35CHRONICLE

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, nature, photography, rural, skies, winter

The Freezing of Time & Tide.


Moving on from my last post, sharing a few grabs from a beautiful coastal spot not far from home over a week ago, I mentioned that on a brighter day, we would return with the munchkins, a small picnic and flasks of tea, coffee and soup! I would also take my IR and LTFS gear along and give Sandyhills ‘the treatment’… jeez, this place screams out like it’s begging for it, I can tell you! Anyway, after checking the forecast for the coming week after our first visit, Wednesday looked like it was to be the best for shooting and, for access, the tide times app gave us a window of around two hours prior to sunset which would enable us to safely get back to the caves and, the Needle’s Eye again. We arrived at a completely empty beach just around lunchtime – not even a dog-walker in sight. We had the whole place to ourselves. I would never have imagined that, even though it was so bitterly cold, that this place would be so empty of people, considering the space here and the fact that sensible outdoor pursuits are still permitted as long as distancing is observed. Still, not a soul for the most part of the time we spent here. A real rarity.

*
I.

35chronicle.256 (3)

*

In my bag, I had my trusty pair of LTFS converted GXRs – one set-up for 720nm IR and the other for VIS using a Tiffen UVIR cut on the front of the lens. This latter set-up, I find, yields noticeably sharper results than a standard VIS camera configuration, which I put down to the (potentially) complete eradication of extraneous wavelengths other than those within the VLS from reaching the sensor. If the light had been poorer and less, I might have removed the UVIR altogether and shot full-spectrum for the extra light it would have gathered (and conversely – softness, due to UVIR light pollution) but, the light played ball and remained (almost) where I wanted it to be.

*
II.

35chronicle.256 (2)

*

One thing I have never seen in my life, though I have lived many years on or near a coast in the UK – is a frozen, receding tide; yet, here it was right in front of us. Stunning, beautiful and, almost other-worldy. If I were not such a fan of Attenborough, I’d have been even further taken aback. Now though, I am reminded of our youngest who, on this day, when he was warned about the lack of grip beneath his feet as he walked behind us, suddenly called out… “Wait! I shouldn’t step on… WHAAAAAAAAAAAAT???! You can guess, perhaps, the position we found him in, the moment he’d finished asking the question! Honestly, to say I pissed myself is a bit of an understatement. The penguin-dive and slide were a nice touch, too!

*
III.

35chronicle.256 (4)

*

Further along the beach, in a deeply recessed rock at the entrance to one of the caves, we sat together on the sand, we ate and drank, we laughed and marvelled at the space around us; the breeze didn’t touch us at all and the sun was by now warm enough that it had us removing our jackets. It was like the world and all its problems didn’t exist – if only for a couple of hours. It was indeed a blissful day. Photography isn’t always just about making photographs, because, I truly believe that the moments between the frames, those feelings that you just can’t capture in a still are always on the outside edge of every single capture – hidden in memory.

*
IV.

35chronicle.256 (1)

*

Enjoy your moments – and capture them, however you can.

R.


HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

2020: A Photographic Review | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, candid, close-up, colour, fine art, full-spectrum, history, Indoor, infrared, landscape, Long Exposure, macro, nature, night / low-light, people, personal, photography, portraits, review, ruins, rural, skies, spring, still life, structures, summer, trees, waterscape

Decisions, Decisions.


Every one of us has a similar story to tell of this trying year that has been – 2020. It was touted as the coming year of clear vision and foresight, change for the better, its number instilling feelings of hope and reason in each of us. It stood for something. Then – it arrived. Instead, it has been the year that has made us all think harder about what it means to be human, about how we act, how we look after ourselves and our fellow man; our families, friends, loved ones and most of all, those whom we will never know and yet we hope that they have also regarded our well-being in just the same way. Not everyone has given it so much thought or consideration though; those who have had us shaking our heads in despair at showings of ignorance or selfishness. That hyper-awareness that has been growing all year, is at its peak now – for those who have been paying attention, that is. So many have suffered and lost, many more have suffered and, will be doing so still. And these thoughts keep me grounded when it comes to looking back over my own personal year – small fish by comparison yet, relevant to what I love.

Over the last ten years, my love for infrared landscape photography has continued to evolve and I have a new love over these latter few years too – old ruins and Marsden-esque scenes that invoke the past, questions, stories forgotten or simply – awe. This year has been a little more tricky though, to capture them. Many places I have wished to visit have been closed or actually close-off, local restrictions have curtailed non-essential travel and I have been made to think a little differently as to what or how I would like to shoot. Another little learning curve has been experienced this year and this can only be a good thing. Creatively, I have still found myself struggling a little – mostly with my own photographic repertoire and not wanting to get ‘stuck’ in a niche – but I think it may be too late for such feelings. The rod is against my back already, however – I feel a coming change in my approach, necessitated by the course of recent history and by the passage of time. Change is inevitable and I can feel it bubbling under the surface. What it will be is yet only a series of random flickers of frames like subliminal advertising pasted inside life’s film reel. They exist – not yet realised. But time is changing us. And it’s changing me. Insosaying, this year’s review isn’t just about looking back at some old photographs – it’s about wondering where I’ll go and what I’ll do next. I still don’t know – but I’m looking forward to finding out. 

It’s been a little tricky for me to select my favourite frames from 2020 – it would’ve been easier if I had chosen by the number of clicks or comments by post. By some choices, I may coincide by accident – but these are my selections based on time, place, feeling and creative satisfaction.  The best I have been able to achieve really is here. All I can hope is that you’ll enjoy this little recap. 

 

*
January 2020: The Wedding Trio | Scotland’s Folly – Calton Hill, Edinburgh.

35chronicle.187 (1)

*
February 2020: Lowther Castle, Cumbria. 720nm IR | 35mm.

29FA3A8E-1479-4B2A-9F46-C290721644DA

*
March 2020: Hermitage Castle. 720nm IR | 35mm.

35chronicle.198 (1)

*
April 2020: Seven Tonics [Whatever Gets You Through].

35chronicle.200

*
May 2020: Home School…

35chronicle.212 (2)

*
June 2020: Air & Water.

35chronicle.219 (2)

*
July 2020: Southerness Lighthouse | 720nm IR w/ Hoya R72 & 10-Stop ND.

35chronicle.226

*
August 2020: Dundrennan Abbey | 720nm IR.

35chronicle.234 (1)

*
September 2020: Suspension Bridge Over the Nith.
*
October 2020: Scott’s View – Melrose & The Magic of a Fair Maiden’s Hand.

35chronicle.240 (3)

*
November 2020: Ol’ Fashioned | 3″ Macro.

35chronicle.244 (4)

*
December 2020: The Silent Bell – Hoddom Castle | 720nm IR.

35chronicle.247 (2)

*

Thank you all so much for your company and your contributions this year, and to both newer followers and more long-standing readers – I am always eternally grateful for your contributions both to my pages and, for what you yourselves create. Thank you! I wish you all a very happy, prosperous and healthy ’21! Please – join me again when you can. 

Warmest wishes to you all… 

Rob.


HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

CORSEWALL LIGHTHOUSE: PT.II | LTFS | 35CHRONICLE

black & white, boats, full-spectrum, photography, rural, skies, structures, waterscape

Loch Ryan’s Beacon.


IV.

35chronicle.250 (1)

*
V.

35chronicle.250 (2)

*
VI.

35chronicle.250 (3)

*
Join Me On Facebook
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Corsewall Lighthouse: PT.I | 720nm IR & LTFS | 35Chronicle

black & white, full-spectrum, history, infrared, landscape, photography, rural, structures, waterscape

The Light & the Dark.

The hotel at the lighthouse had been on our list of places to visit for a little while now, not least because it promotes itself as wedding venue too and, given recent engagements (ahem!) and our fondness for the west of our county, we made the journey during a three day stay in Portpatrick. The coastline is simply stunning here and even though the weather was extremely moody at best (and howling at its worst) there was no way that we were going to forego this particular jaunt. Looking out from the mouth of Loch Ryan it is hard to even contemplate why anyone would wish to look in any other direction, no matter what the elements.

Built around 1816-1817, the fully functioning tower is still run by the Northern Lighthouse Board, however, since automation in 1994 – the rest of the buildings were converted into a hotel. Word has it that in 1817, Corsewall’s Principle Light Keeper had fallen asleep on duty which caused the light to fail for a time, to the detriment of passing ships heading towards the coastline, and so therefore, he was subsequently and severely demoted. In November of 1970, Concorde flew over Corsewall Lighthouse on a trial flight and when passing the tower, it shattered many panes of glass around the light. Later flights by Concorde would not cause the same phenomena. Sadly though, at the time of our visit the whole place was closed due to the effects of Coronavirus and ensued restrictions and, we were unable to enter. Instead, after a lovely walk around the place and taking in the views, Bumble sought protection from the ever worsening elements inside the car, and why not? Nobody wants to get soaking wet or freezing cold on their birthday!

*
I |  The Hotel & Tower [720nm IR]

35chronicle.249 (1)

*

As I walked Bumble back from the hotel itself towards the car, having wandered around the tower and the foghorn together so that I could grab a few frames, we were met by a lady in her 4×4 who, having sped down the hill stopped alongside us on approach to the building and wound down her window to speak to us. Then, she asked the one question that is guaranteed to irk me more than any other when I am making my frames. “Can I help you?” she asked. Well, “I don’t know, can you take over shooting for me if I should suddenly forget how to do it?” I wanted to reply. Instead, I refrained from sarcasm and exchanged politely with her until she explained that she owned the place and was popping in to check her emails. Why would I even care about that? In truth, I think our presence triggered off a sensor or we were on camera perhaps, prompting her expedient arrival from her nearby abode. I mean, I can see how a couple like us would put a lot of fear into someone – especially when you take in the evidence – holding hands, the odd cuddle to dispel the cold of the gusts, the picture taking. Of course. I once again prepared to endure the worsening elements – for the sake of art, you understand. I mean, why else?

*
II |  ‘Round the Rugged Rock the Ragged Rascal Ran [LTFS]

35chronicle.249 (2)

*

Getting here though, was a bit of pain the derriere – and I am surprised that anyone planning a wedding or reception would make the trek if they knew beforehand how the final part of their journey would pan out, should the weather turn sour. This is definitely a fair-weather destination if you wish to remain – unsavoury. Imagine if you will, donning your finest finery, having washed and polished the car (as such an occasion would suggest as appropriate) and turning out as pristinely as you possibly could before setting off. Your journey to within a mile or two of Corsewall may be largely uneventful, perhaps even wonderful, then the heavens open as you approach the back roads, past the farms, through as much cow-sh*t as it’s possible to spread across the hugely pitted and pot-holed tracks that wind around and down towards the tower. Imagine too, all of that muck sprayed up both sides of your previously pristine jalopy, as you pray that you won’s split a rim or two in any of the deeper craters who’s depth and severity are sinisterly hidden beneath copious quantities of shit and water. (You can tell I’m a little precious about my car now, can’t you?!) So – let the nightmare begin! How to arrive? Or, how not to! Perhaps save it for the sunshine?

Despite high winds and a decent amount of rain, I somehow managed to snag a number of shots both in IR and in LTFS (full-spectrum) when the light started to fade – that I am actually very happy with. Sorry about all the back story and though not every shoot I go on isn’t as romantic as they might appear to be, I hope too that you’ll enjoy these first few frames of (really) a beautiful and picturesque corner of South West Scotland. 

*
III |  The Tower & Foghorn [LTFS]

35chronicle.249 (3)

*

Thank you ever so much for reading and I do hope that you are keeping safe and well.

Until PT.II – toodle-pip!

R.

*
Join Me On Facebook
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Call Me Old Fashioned… | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, colour, fine art, full-spectrum, macro, people, personal, photography, portraits, still life

A Prior Engagement.


Okay, a little bit of an announcement. At the end of last month, after two years together through thick (and even thicker) I proposed to Bumble and – after her initial tears of disbelief and throwing her hands up to her face at the sight of me on one knee, she said, “Yes”! Needless to say, we are both ridiculously happy and our wonderful nuclear family, too, has a solidified and renewed direction. After everything we’ve come through over the last eighteen months or so, I couldn’t be happier. But this post isn’t just an announcement. This is a photography blog after all and I have been waiting until I had the requisite shots, before writing.

As an engagement gift to me, Bumble gave me a new cocktail watch for my wrist and also, for my growing collection. I have collected watches, (only certain movements it must be said) for many years and, this new gift had me rather stunned, even moreso because she clearly knows me so well. Insosaying, though I do feel a tad selfish posting these, it also stands as my little testament to the value of time and, how we spend it. Many of my readers will know that I don’t just shoot old ruins and infrared scenes – I enjoy many forms of photography and macro-photography is one of my firm favourites and major passions when I am forced to shoot indoors. Couple this with my love of mechanical watches (as opposed to quartz movements) where, I have always felt that there is more magic and fairy dust inside such a watch than levers, cogs and springs, well, you might understand just how marvellous and precious these instruments are to me, personally. And, a watch is a very personal thing. If it is thing of visual beauty, then I am in awe of it. Keats said something very similar, I recall. Such is the case here, with my beautiful (5147/8000) Seiko Presage SSA392J1.

With its 4R57 automatic movement, 41-hour power reserve indicator, gorgeous colours (inspired by the classic, ‘Old Fashioned’ cocktail – recipe at the bottom of this post!) perhaps it is indeed, itself, a classic in the making. What I am certain of however, is that for me, this combination is as classic as it’s possible to get and the value of time somehow becomes even more poignant when I wear it. So, by way of utter appreciation and gratitude for the love of the woman in my life, who knows me better than I do – I now post a few shots that I have very carefully selected after a painstaking couple of days editing, post-shooting. Whatever you photograph, it should always be shot with love. I hope I have done enough here.

(For anyone interested, these frames were made with my Ricoh GR III (the closest frame, with the Hoya +10 – front-mounted) except for frame two of Angela, which was shot on an LTFS converted Ricoh GXR, in full-spectrum – hence the slight softness of the focus). 

Thank you so much for bearing with me and for reading once again. I hope you’ll enjoy these few frames too.

… To Bumble – whatever I have to say to you, I’ll say it in private! 

R.

*
I.

35chronicle.244 (1)

*
II.

35chronicle.244 (3)

*
III.

35chronicle.244 (6)

*
IV.

35chronicle.244 (2)

*
V.

35chronicle.244 (5)

*
VI.

35chronicle.244 (4)

*
To Mix an Old Fashioned:
  • Place the sugar cube in an Old Fashioned glass. 
  • Wet it down with Angostura bitters and a short splash of club soda.
  • Crush sugar with a wooden muddler, rotate the glass so that the sugar grains and bitters give it a lining. 
  • Add a large ice cube. Pour in the whiskey. 
  • Garnish with an orange twist, and serve with a stirring rod if you’re so inclined.

…and, relax!

R.

*

HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Carnsalloch House, Kirkton | 35Chronicle

black & white, full-spectrum, photography, ruins, rural, structures

Black & White Heaven | A Full-Spectrum Photographic Adventure.


14th August 2020.

It all started with a half-hearted faff-around on the web, looking for some more interesting, old and abandoned places nearby worthy of a visit and, a photo-sesh. I’ve taken my cameras to so many wonderful old and [seemingly] forgotten places over the past many years that I might well at some point have thought that I may have ticked off a good many of them but still, I love to be proved wrong and, surprised. Last week, I got another such surprise when Bumble stumbled upon a short article about Carnsalloch House, near Kirkton. Passing me her ‘phone, she asked, “How about this old place? It’s not far, either!” I took a look and, feeling that familiar pang of excitement, a huge smile now lay wide across my face. Tomorrow, we would go. The BBC weather app was called to duty and, the day was consigned.

Not even two weeks prior, I had sent off a couple of A16 lens units for my trusty GXR outfit, to my good and clever friend, Amar. One was for a simple sensor clean and, the other for another LTFS [full-spectrum] conversion. Only a few days later they arrived back and, I was extremely keen to put them both through their paces again – dedicating one for LTFS [UV + VIS + IR] shooting and, the other for 720nm IR; this would save me swapping out mounted lens filters as the light changed. I know too that Amar is very keen to see results from his labours and, who can blame him? With that said, all of the frames I will be sharing over this series were shot on both units and, with nothing else. Anyhooz, back to Carnsalloch House…

The Old Stable Building:

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:1467 | VIS.

35chronicle.233 (1)

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:209 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (4)

When we arrived at first, we thought we’d found the house. Poking around outside and comparing the few shots we’d found on the ‘net had us befuddled and actually scratching our heads because the shots definitely didn’t correspond to the building we had arrived at. It was certainly a grand building but there were too many differences to ignore. This wasn’t the place. Still, it was worth a good look and so we carefully found an easy way inside. After a quick look around, it was clear to see from the original ceiling height, the sheer cubic footage of each room and the huge arched entry doors front and rear that we were actually inside the old stable building. The Austin Maestro ‘Tandy’ van (made between 1982 and 1995) that stood just as derelict as the building itself, looked no bigger than a child’s toy in here. Vandals have visited and, revisited over the years – fires have been set and spray cans have been emptied and this once, clearly magnificent building, now lies in complete ruin with no hope of rescue. After an hour or so, with the afternoon moving steadily on, we decided to look for the locally famous crypt. Quite how many know of it is unknown to me but there are very few images to discover online and, in true fashion, I decided that I wanted to change that. What I had seen of it had me feeling very edgy, and keen to push on and – find it. Looking around the old Johnston Estate, we followed what appeared to be a promising trail to where we believed it might have been an ideal place to build such a thing. Only a five minute walk from the old stable building, we came across the instantly recognisable Carnsalloch House.

28mm | 1/125th | f6.8 | ISO:591 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (2)

28mm | 1/125th | f6.8 | ISO:351 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (3)

Carnsalloch House:

24mm | 1/500th | f8 | ISO:200 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (5)

The house has been empty since 2000 or thereabouts and since then, it too has been the target of arsonists and vandals. Built in 1759 (there is a stone depicting this on the outside wall of the north wing) Carnsalloch was once a palladian two-storey mansion house; an A-listed building (as of May 1959) that first belonged to Alexander Johnston[e] of Carnsalloch – a London chemist. Along its timeline, the house has had many extensions built (and destroyed by fire) and, for its latter years since 1960 it was run by the Leonard Cheshire Foundation (a UK health and welfare charity). It is reportedly the most haunted house in Scotland and has even raised questions and concerns about the sighting of ‘the ghost of’ a Great Dane – standing at a first floor window to the east of the pillared entrance. Believe what you will, but there are those who have wandered the area with dog treats in hand, hoping to find the pooch and, lure it to safety. I have no idea as to whether the canine (apparition or not) was ever located or indeed, seen again. Suffice to say, we met nor encountered no Grey Lady, or a seemingly semi-see-through Scooby-Doo! Largely, due to the extensive damage and vandalism, this once gorgeous building was not so much of a treat to walk around as we would have hoped. Entry on our part would have been extremely dangerous (and probably quite stupid, too) and so, we took a look only around the outer building itself. The weather too was closing in a tad and after just a few frames, we headed back to the car for a re-group. It was time again to re-consult the oracle. We just had to find the crypt.

The Johnston[e] Chapel & Crypt:

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:591 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (6)

It was almost impossible to find any useful information about the Crypt. Nothing we could find could tell us where the heck it was situated but one search made us think that it could be in the vicinity of Kirkton Kirk itself. Time was still on our side (just) and so, we set off again. Barely a mile on, we stopped and looked around the church, looking for signs and familiar landscapes from images we’d found that would point us in the right direction. Nothing. We scratched our heads again and, while I was checking my batteries and cards, Bumble showed me her ‘phone again. I was now looking at a small map of Cemetery Wood. There was a red pointer marked only some fifty yards from the road out of Kirkton. We excitedly spun around again.

The light was fading as the clouds moved in and, seemingly there was nowhere to stop anywhere near the wood. Checking the road behind, between the bends as we approached the sharp left near the entrance to the wood itself, Bumble spied the small patch of ground just off the road and right around the bend and made straight for it. Parked. Now to find the crypt. Climbing over the gate, eyes peeled – no sign. Observing the light under densely foliaged and closely-neighboured trees I was beginning to worry that even if we found the crypt, I’d have little useful light under which to shoot it. Certainly IR was not going to be a choice. We walked towards a high mound and there, through the murk, was the corner outline of what was clearly a beautiful and ornate stone structure. We hurried forward and climbed the earthy slope. Stood right in front of us – was the crypt.

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:436 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (7)

Out of interest, one of the shots I’d seen on the web (of the Johnston[e] Crypt) was in fact an IR shot, taken by someone on a converted Nikon pocket camera of some sort. A slight hint of jealousy that someone had stolen a little thunder from me, sure – but, whimsical and no more. I was determined to capture this place reflecting its mood and setting. LTFS turned out to be absolutely perfect for this part of the trip due to the light conditions and, it enabled me to capture wavelengths impossible to do so with any of my visible light set-ups, thus keeping my Tv higher and ISO lower than usual. The frames of the crypt may have you realising that I was back in hog-heaven and, you’d be right. I was beside myself. The chapel and crypt were built in around 1850 and, have also suffered multiple break-ins, vandalism, roof damage due to a fallen tree – gables and ornate roof stones scatter the ground around it and as resting place, it has been desecrated horrendously. Seeing it, taking it all in just for what it is now – renders a feeling of noticeable sadness. But to be able to capture it like this – I am almost speechless now. I am still stunned that we even found it. Rather, I didn’t! It’s okay though.

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:295 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (8)

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:766 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (9)

It was my intention to post a few images at a time and over a few posts – you know, break it up a little bit? I never like to over-indulge or test a reader’s resolve or patience. Ever. But for some reason, I just want to get these frames out there. A little bit of a back-story, perhaps but without the means to yet find out more about Carnsalloch – this is the best I can do right now. I do hope that you’ve enjoyed these frames. They have been extremely pleasurable to make and mean a little more to me than some of my other works. If you have stuck with me through all of this – wow; and… thank you!

In closing this one, I would like to thank Amar for yet again creating for me another wonderful piece of technology – my leading eye is very fortunate, my friend. I remain in black and white Nirvana! Thank you, my friend!

To the R&D and marketing peeps at Pentax Ricoh – thank you for making what Ricoh must have believed was a bit of a mistake at the time – poppycock! This thing rocks – still!

Of course, equally, to my bestie and lifetime sidekick, Bumble – who seems to have as much passion for what I do as I do. Now there’s a rarity and one worth looking after. Cheers darlin’!

R.
24mm | 1/125th | f5.9 | ISO:456 | LTFS.

35chronicle.233 (10)


HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
Feel free to join me on Instagram (click below) and, thank you for visiting.
@35chroniclephotography

The Mono-Archives | PT.V | 35Chronicle

black & white, cityscapes, full-spectrum, photography, urban

To & From: a Place I Love | A Full-Spectrum Collection.


*
I | Cranes – from Calton Hill.

35chronicle.223 (1)

*
II | To Arthur’s Seat.

35chronicle.223 (2)

*
III | To the Scott Monument from the Royal Mile.

35chronicle.223 (3)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
Feel free to join me on Instagram (click below) and, thank you for visiting.
@35chroniclephotography
R.
*