An Alternative ‘Scott’s View’ – Melrose | 35Chronicle

35mm, 50mm, autumn / fall, black & white, history, infrared, landscape, nature, photography, rural, trees

The Site of Trimontium: A Trilogy.


A single day’s journey into the Scottish Borders last week had us purposefully perusing local maps for all of the sights we’d hoped to visit – while the threatening weather remained (mostly) on our side. One of the day’s most anticipated sites was here, at the renowned and history-steeped Scott’s View – Sir Walter Scott’s favourite view out to the triple-peaked Eildon Hills. At over 420m in height they look out to Teviotdale to the south and the northernmost peak has been discovered to be covered in over 5km of ramparts which enclose an area of around 40 acres within which at least 300 level platforms have been formed within the rock itself in order to have provided bases for houses. It is believed that the site was occupied as far back as 1000BC. During the 1st Century CE (common era) – the Romans had erected the huge fort of Trimontium of Newstead (named after the three peaks) at the foot of the hill on the bank of the River Tweed. As sights go – they don’t get a lot better than this on such a glorious day.

The hollow (as legends would have it) hills are actually marilyns and are steeped in folklore, as well as history, as the words of ‘Thomas the Rhymer’ would attest. Formed by the upward push of an underground volcano around 300m years ago, they were cleft in three by the magician Michael Scot as written by Walter Scott in his poem ‘The Lay of the Last Minstrel’, in 1805. With all this said, however, words alone cannot describe the feeling when standing at this spot and looking out at all of… this.

As most captures from up here would depict a very similar view with my standard set-ups, I decided to do things a little differently. The lens-ball treatment was a huge amount of fun and, I could never have left this scene without having grabbed an IR frame or two as well. (If you have been reading my pages for a while now, you’ll know this already, I guess).  Thank you so much for reading and have a great weekend, all!

R.

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[Equip: X100-IR & X100s w/50mm TCL]

I | Through the Ball – 50mm.

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II | 720nm Infrared – 35mm.

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III | The Magic of a Fair Maiden’s Hand.

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Dundrennan Abbey | 720nm IR – PT.III | 35Chronicle

black & white, history, infrared, photography, ruins, rural, structures

I Really, Really Can’t Help It!

Way back in April of last year, I wrote what was to be my first post on Dundrennan Abbey. It was certainly not the first time I have shot here for, I have been revisiting this beautiful ruin for almost twenty years. It has a draw that very few other places can illicit quite in the way that it does and, seeing as how I keep my cameras with me whenever I’m on any kind of road-trip, well – it stands to reason that if ever I am near the place and I have time to stop, I invariably do. I don’t always get lucky with the light but seeing as how I have shot here over a dozen times or so, I have a very pleasing stash of visible light and infrared captures. Each time, I try to see different angles of the abbey, capture something different and – this can be quite a challenge because revisiting somewhere, anywhere, multiple times in order to shoot can lead to a bit of muscle-memory taking over, trying to catch again those favourite angles only – better, this time. I sometimes have to try very hard to stop myself from doing this. Nonetheless, I also believe in shooting every angle possible while on location and, edit hard when I get to the upload at home. This little shoot was a tad different though. I have started to be more selective when it comes to the work of my shutter-finger. If I don’t ‘see’ it, I don’t shoot it anymore. If I see the frame and it’s not working for me, no matter what the balance between positive and negative elements, the camera will mostly stay in my bag nowadays. With that said, these frames came pretty naturally and while I did repeat a few past shots, these are (to my mind) a little more mature and pleasing. On this occasion, well over a year since my last visit, the grounds are now extremely overgrown; the result of a pandemic which as yet displays no signs of abating to the point of disappearing and so, much is left to wither. The lack of maintenance here at Dundrennan, however, only amplifies its historical and physical authenticity from a visual perspective – and despite the hard work put in under normal circumstances to maintain these grounds and this stunning structure, I rather prefer the look it has now that nobody has touched it since our own lockdown commenced.

On a much different note: I notice now that my followers have surpassed 300 here on 35Chronicle Photography and I cannot let this go without saying a massive thank you to each and every one of you who follow my pages, and also, to the many of you who don’t follow yet return to read and peruse my words and images. I started this blog back in early 2018 and when there is so much competition (for want of a better word) for people’s time and consideration, I do feel that with this amount of followers and over 22,000 views to date – I have a lot to be very grateful for. To all of you, from the bottom of my heart, Thank You All!

Just lately I have been extremely busy with prints so it has taken me a little longer to getting round to posting, this week. I do hope though, that you will enjoy the following few frames as much as I do. Thank you so much for reading.

R.

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I.

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II.

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III.

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[All frames captured with Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72]

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Apollo 11: For Michael Collins [and Neil & Buzz] | 35:Chronicle

history, people, photography, skies

Snoopy [& Other Underdogs].


Oddly, though I had this post planned for a week or more, after an impromptu visit to McD’s today – I found the perfect way to commemorate all underdogs everywhere, as well as this marvellous anniversary. Celebrating a young boy’s birthday I found one of my childhood heroes staring back at me from, of all places, the inside of a Happy Meal. Not one child at the table could tell me who he was or the name of his scruffy little companion – but Peanuts-styled memories came flooding back. I bought two more to make the set – of three wind-up, moon-walking NASA Snoopys; repleat with Pumpkin Suits and backpacks. My smile was huge.

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Three of a Perfect Pair.

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Snoopy Woz ‘Ere?

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Tomorrow, on 16th July 2019 – it will have been fifty years to the day since the Apollo 11 mission was launched, which would land the first man on the moon, on 20th July 1969. That was the year during which I was born, too, almost four months later. In the grounds of Drumlanrig House, (near the Scottish town of Thornhill) – not far from me, where Neil Armstrong once stayed is a forty-seven year old Red Oak, planted in the March of ’72 by the man himself.

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The Growth of History.

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It’s an incredible part of human history but like many (I am supposing, here) it’s always been my opinion that Michael Collins didn’t get enough love or glory for his unforgettable contribution to those future-shaping events of 1969. Waiting in the moon’s orbit for Buzz and Apollo 11’s commander, Neil Armstrong to complete their short mission on the surface must have felt sickening and lonely; standing at the open doors to the greatest show on earth, looking in, hearing the fun that everyone else is having but, having to wait outside and endure it. Plenty of documentaries and publications can give us a huge amount of information about almost any detail of that mission, but how much did Michael Collins not tell about how he felt during those eight days? I have to wonder. Though an integral part of that incredible mission, hardly anyone I have asked can name all three crew-members; and Michael’s is the name most forgotten. I’m not here to set any record straight, but I’m sending out my own equal recognition for him as well. Like Neil & Buzz, I’m pretty sure he’s earned it.

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Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong & Buzz Aldrin [Left to Right]

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Thank you for visiting. If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided.
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