Eleven Arches: PT.II | 850nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, landscape, photography, rural, skies, structures

Kinclair Viaduct, Pinmore – Revisited.


Just about three years ago (give or take a month) I first shot the amazing, grand, utterly imposing viaduct just south of Pinmore on the Newton Stewart to Girvan road. I had to check my files from back then, some of which I posted in No.30, to recall which cameras I took with me on that shoot. Made on my old GR and X100T cameras, I came away with some very pleasing black and white images caught on a less than perfect day for contrast and I also recall that even the sky was so flat and diffused that the resulting frames rendered it featureless. But, I had travelled a very long way in order to shoot this iconic structure and vowed always, to go back. Maybe, I’d give it my IR treatment next time? Alright, so that was a rhetorical question!

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I | Kinclair Viaduct | 850nm IR | 24mm | 1/125th – f8 – ISO:400

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Of course I always intended to do that, so when the sun came out yesterday, Bumble and I headed off, westwards towards the A714, and north-west of Newton. In fairness, we’d been planning it for a couple of days (it’s not prudent to put any faith in the weather forecast anywhere in Scotland, more than forty-eight hours in advance; any of you who live here or have visited for more than a day, will understand exactly what I’m talking about!) When it came to the shots I’d make – I had thought to shift up from 720nm and decided that 850nm would give me a little more contrast under good light. I’d need that extra light to keep my film speed down and my shutter speeds up negating my need for the three-legged thing. As you can see from the frames here, I got very lucky with the light. One pair of frames in particular (No.I in this post and No.VI to come in the following share) did have us scrabbling upwards through tricky dense foliage in order to get the height and length I needed to grab the shot I had always imagined I would take on my first visit – a few minor abdominal wounds today remind me that the climb was well worth it and without that little extra effort, I would have come away knowing that the shot was there for the taking and I did nothing to get it – but it’s here, and the wounds will heal. Please do click the link to my original post and compare, because I truly believe that from the ground, these are the best IR shots I could possibly have made on any day such as this.

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II | Two of Eleven | 850nm | 24mm | 1/125th – f8 – ISO:911 (!)

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Dedications:

To my long-suffering and ever encouraging, Bumble – I thank you for getting into my scrapes for the sake of art! What else can I say? To all of you who visit and revisit my pages, click, comment and get involved – thank you all so much. The best that I can hope is that you will enjoy some of these captures – enough to come back. I utterly love what I do and take none of it for granted; and so – I keep doing it with the same passion and love that I felt when I first discovered what was even possible. To my good friend, Amar – your creations still help me make some of my most pleasing and dramatic work and in this regard, words fail me. Thank you, my friend! 

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III | Woodburn Cottage | 850nm IR | 35mm | 1/80th – f6.3 – ISO:200

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Until PT.II – I do hope you’ll enjoy these few frames and, I wish you all a very happy and healthy weekend ahead.

R.

[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Front Mounted 850nm IR Filter]


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Mono-Archives: PT.VII | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, infrared, Long Exposure, nature, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures

The Way They Move…


Gelston Castle: Long Exposure 720nm IR | 60″ – f22 – ISO:100

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The Lighthouse at Southerness: Long Exposure 720nm IR | 30″ – f22 – ISO:100

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Corbelly Hill Convent, Dumfries: PT.III | 720nm IR | 35Chronicle Photography

28mm, 35mm, 50mm, black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, infrared, photography, ruins, structures, urban

One Last Look Around.


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VII.

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VIII.

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IX.

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X.

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Corbelly Hill Convent, Dumfries: PT.II | 720nm IR | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, infrared, photography, ruins, structures, urban, waterscape

In the Light & the Dark.


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IV

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V

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VI

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

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Corbelly Hill Convent, Dumfries: PT.I | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, full-spectrum, history, infrared, photography, ruins, structures, trees, urban

All Roads Lead to… Roam?!?


Content Warning: This post contains elements of sarcasm, arrogance and common-sense, which some readers may find either offensive, or rib-tickling – depending on your sense of humour!

I may or may not be about to start on a little ‘Rob-rant’; in fact – perhaps I’ll just roll my eyes at this point and take a deep breath instead. Yes, that may be a better thing to do. You see, the one question I get asked a lot when I am out shooting old buildings, ruins, lighthouses, you name ’em – is, “Can I help you?” You may have read my thoughts about this question during one of my posts where I published a few frames of the beautiful lighthouse at Corsewall [PT.I – here] back in December, last year. It grates me every time – and it shouldn’t. 

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I

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I have been meaning to come here to the old convent at Corbelly Hill for around six months. Waiting for a clear day with good sunlight and plenty of time has been the only reason it has taken me so long to get up here, to what is the highest building in Dumfries. Known as St. Benedict’s, and also – Corbelly Hall Convent, it was commissioned in 1881 for the Nuns of the Perpetual Adoration and, was completed in 1884. In its time, it has also been used as a girls’ school, a makeshift Sheriff Court and even a museum. It has lain empty and semi-derelict for a good many years now, though. In 2003, it was used in the filming of Peter Mullan’s film “The Magdalene Sisters” – set in 1964 onwards, about the cruel abuse of women at a convent in Ireland. Though I would dearly have loved to have spent some time shooting inside the buildings, as some have before me – it was not to be. 

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II

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One utterly fabulous thing about Scotland is the right to roam and so, seeing no signage indicating otherwise either, Bumble and I took the walk up the hill from Maxwell Street, enjoying the clearest of views over the town on the way up and, we had a little scout around the outside of this beautiful building with a view to setting up for some fitting frames. The light was just about perfect by midday and it almost took my breath away with the sheer size of this place. As we walked around towards the main entrance, we noticed two police vans, a builder’s van and, a couple of cars. Old vinyl 45s from the 70s were strewn curiously and chaotically across the lawns. A broken window to the left of the main entrance door. Not a person in sight though. We picked up a few of the vinyls and read their labels – each one a 70s chart-hit and not a true dud among them if I’m honest. As we wandered the grounds, I began to capture a few shots. That’s when a short and stocky, builder-chappy – surly of face and postured with intent, walked towards us with his faithful right-hand man… to his left. “Can I help you?” he asked. I smiled gently, trying to not smile my facetious smile at the one question that presents to me every time as a red rag to a proverbial bull. “I’m not sure.” I politely replied. “How much do you know about infrared photography?” This precipitated a stunned silence and a quizzical expression in the gentleman who, once he had remembered why he had asked the question in the first place, told us that there had been a break-in that morning and he was concerned as, he had just acquired the building for himself. “Fair enough, but as you can see – you’re unlikely to get any trouble from us. Would it be okay if we carry on around and get a few more frames before the gates go in?” We were graciously (okay, a little facetious there, I know!) granted the freedom to roam once more; our attire possibly an obvious indication that we were not at all dressed for a raid on this day and were safe to be let loose. Yet, every which way we turned from that moment on, we were followed at a distance of no more than ten paces by the builder-chappy and three others of his crew; every word Bumble and I shared from that moment on, was not private. We contained ourselves to the awe of this place and reigned in our feelings about what had just happened. 

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III

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For around four or five days after I made these frames I was confined to being back at work and so, I literally have only just got around to edits today and, having finished working on this series, I really do have the pleasure of sharing a number of shots with you, which, I sincerely do hope you will enjoy. One more day and I’ll be back in the jug again… so who knows, I may get a few more up tomorrow, too? 

Thank you again for reading and I do hope that you’re getting set for a wonderful weekend. 

R.

This post is thoughtfully dedicated to all owners of derelict land and property who needlessly fear the evil intentions of the middle-classes who walk hand in hand, wielding small cameras.

Fear not – we’re only making pictures!

[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

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When Elements Align | PT.II | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, infrared, photography, skies, spring, structures, urban, waterscape

River Nith – Recomposed | 720nm Infrared.


A parting gift from the Nith, glorified under beautiful IR light; the first three frames from which were shared in my previous post. Playing the angles a little has helped me to see that frame ‘VI’ is for me anyway, rather better composed than frame ‘II’ in PT.I – the lesson has to be: always take a series and never trust the first take! Nonetheless, I do hope that you will also enjoy these captures and, to those who’ve clicked, commented and reposted my last entry – I am more grateful than you can know. As I have always believed, writing or sharing anything here is absolutely worthless without each of you who read and get involved. So, thank you!

From a sunny South West Scotland – wishing you all a very happy Tuesday!

R.

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IV: Devorgilla Bridge Across the Nith | 720nm Infrared.

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V: Buccleuch Street Bridge from Devorgilla Bridge | 720nm Infrared.

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VI: Hunters Gathering [II] | 720nm Infrared.

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

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When Elements Align | PT.I | 35Chronicle

black & white, fine art, infrared, nature, photography, skies, structures, urban, waterscape

River Nith | Back in the ‘Red’.


For the last few years, I have been up and down this stretch of the River Nith more times than I can remember, shooting visible-light monochrome, long-exposure night shots and plenty of infrared frames too – all in the hope of capturing that ‘perfect’ series of frames – shots I’d be so proud to print and hang on the wall; but without labouring the point, I have always felt that I have struggled here. The reasons I keep coming back and having yet another go are purely the attraction and, the challenge. It really is an eye-catching place. With regard to IR capturing however, I don’t think that I have ever come back with the shots that I had always itched for. Despite its obvious charms, it’s really not the easiest place to photograph and requires a lot of care where composition is concerned and though I have been enjoying this caper for well over twenty years, I accept that it’s no great surprise to me that it’s taken me until now to feel satisfied with my efforts.

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I. Along the Caul | River Nith, Dumfries | 720nm Infrared.

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Having a ‘thing’ for beautiful bridges and picturesque skies as I clearly do, makes some decisions on angles and perspective a little bit more intuitive when it comes to where I want the structures to be viewed within their frames but there’s a whole lot more going on around them, which, often has me scratching my head. Learning to ‘see’ within a frame and compose is largely down to preference, but there are certain rules which I do try my best to adhere to – such as subject, light and contrast, texture (and contrasting textures too), proportions, foreground, background, overall feel – and also, my own space and place within it all. On this day, the light was just about perfect and I was inspired to have another go.

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II. Hunters Gathering | River Nith, Dumfries | 720nm Infrared.

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As more and more people are now out and about in their cars, on foot or bikes after the last year of repeated and prolonged C-19 lockdowns, it was fabulous to get out here and see some more life about the place. As the sun beat down, we leisurely walked over the Devorgilla Bridge to the other side of the river and felt like living was starting to happen again which for me is certainly yet another reason to feel inspired. As we crossed the bridge, an opera-fan with very capable speakers punched out a little culture in Gm from  an upper storey window, an unusual backing track to the sound of the streets below and yet, I couldn’t help smiling because of it.

The elements had aligned and, I do hope you’ll enjoy these first few little outcomes.

R.

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III. Buccleuch Street Bridge, Dumfries | 720nm Infrared.

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

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In Long Forgotten Corners… | 720nm IR – PT.II | 35Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures, waterscape

…Yet Standing, Still.


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IV | A Little Perspective | Parton Viaduct | 720nm IR

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V | From the Bank of Loch Ken | 720nm IR [… kind of!]

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VI | A Last Look Back | 720nm IR [… with a little help!]

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

Link: Video taken in 1965, just before closure, in June of that year – opens in new window.

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In Long Forgotten Corners… | 720nm IR – PT.I | 35Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins, rural, structures, trees, waterscape

… and, Outside the Lines.

Of the things I absolutely love to do the most when the rain has passed (especially during prolonged lockdown measures, still current here in Dumfries & Galloway) getting out for a little daily exercise is one of them. Even if it is only a short walk with my cameras. Living in a county that is relatively sparsely populated, and that has more open space and beautiful scenery than one could possibly shake a proverbial stick at – is a bonus. It’s really not all that difficult to socially-distance here. With the weather clearing a few days ago, we decided to bundle ourselves into ChugaBoom and head out to a tiny hamlet near Castle Douglas, where we knew of an old bridge… 

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I | The Parton Viaduct – 1861-1965 | 720nm IR

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One of my favourite films inspired this little shoot and, if you have ever watched Eastwood & Streep in the ’95 film, “The Bridges of Maddison County” (yes, I know it’s touted as a chick-flick; who cares?!) you’ll perhaps understand why. What I wouldn’t give for the opportunity to simply drive – and shoot whatever caught my interest. Bridges, as it happens, have always been very high on my list and that’s why, just a  few days ago, Meryl, the chuckle-brothers and I made the short drive to Parton.

In 1861, the Port Road (aka: The Paddy Line) opened its rail service from Dumfries to Stranraer. Instead of taking the coastal route – it cut through thirty-two miles of Galloway’s hills. It was thought that a saving had been made at a cost of £7000 per mile, but due to extra construction required to accommodate the many gradients on its route, it turned out to be a false economy. Still, the line was open until 1965, at which time it was shut forever. Many of the stations on the line still stand in some form and Loch Skerrow’s platform (the smallest and most remote surviving in the UK) is barely one slab of stone seated above the ground on concrete plinths and surrounded by open land – you’d never know it, unless you knew already. But it’s Parton’s old metal viaduct I was interested in and, I hope from my frames here, you’ll see exactly why. 

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II | A Little More High-Key | 720nm IR

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The Boat o’ Rhone, the Parton Viaduct, the Loch Ken Railway Viaduct – it’s been called by many names. Nonetheless, it stands still in time, gated off now due its increasingly old and unstable floor but, through the bars, it can still be caught in two dimensions. I think that one of the beauties of my utter enjoyment of capturing in infrared, is the ability to feel that excitement every time I make a trip and to see what I can discover and capture – to enjoy in a way not often (or possibly never) enjoyed before. The light plays tricks, the clouds cover the sun… my eyes will dart around looking for vantage points, angles, flecks of light as rays of hope – but on this day, I was thwarted somewhat by the cover, above me.  Nonetheless, though I was not rewarded with strong IR light, I still have some frames that I am very happy to share with you and, I sincerely do hope that you’ll enjoy them, from this little corner of Scotland.

As always, thank you for reading, please do leave any comments below and, I hope you are all very well and winding down to a fabulous weekend.

R.

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III | Through the Bars of Locked Gates | 720nm IR

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[All frames: Ricoh GXR LTFS Full-Spectrum Conversion & Hoya R72 720nm IR Filter]

Link: Video taken in 1965, just before closure, in June of that year – opens in new window.

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Drumlanrig Castle – Revisited | PT.II | 35Chronicle

50mm, black & white, photography, rural, structures

Splendour in Stone.


After my last post of the stonkingly gorgeous Drumlanrig Castle, here are my final three frames which were made with my Sigma DP3 Merrill. Its 50mm [75mm equivalent] is probably my favourite of the three I have in my bag and, requires more thought to use for architecture and landscape compositions than the wider 30mm[45mm] and 19mm [28mm] lens versions. The micro-contrast of this lens and sensor pairing absolutely bite my face off on review for editing and the details punch back hard for good measure, too. This thing needs a little taming, I think. Now, the cage and chair are ready – if I could only find my whip?!

For all of your clicks and comments on my previous post, thank you so much! I hope you’ll enjoy these few longer FL frames. 

R.

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I | 1/160th – f5.6 – ISO:200

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II | 1/100th – f5.6 – ISO:100

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III | 1/80th – f5.6 – ISO:100

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Drumlanrig Castle – Revisited | PT.I | 35Chronicle

black & white, photography, rural, structures

Old Habits Die Hard.


Last week we took a spin in the new jalopy and headed for a place that not only do we both love, but also somewhere that I have so enjoyed making photographs for almost twenty years. Though my techniques have evolved moreso over the last ten years or so, sometimes, I still crave the simple, bare-bones approach to shooting. Drumlanrig Castle is as beautiful a place as any I have ever visited that can shine all by itself, with the simplest of photographic approaches. Some subjects need little work at all. The last time I photographed here was back in early November ’19 [Post No.166]. It was so good to be back, especially before the gardens open to the public again! All this space to myself… kid, sweetshop…

All frames: Sigma DP2 Merrill | 30mm [45mm Equivalent].

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I | 1/50th -f8 – ISO:125

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II | 1/80th – f5.6 – ISO:100

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III | 1/100th – f8 – ISO:100

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Abnormal Service is Resumed | 35Chronicle

black & white, colour, photography, rural, structures, waterscape

When I said “It’s Not Over Yet”…

… I meant it. Back in Post No.62 [August 2018] – I shared a few 715nm & 760nm infrared frames from Talla Reservoir, here in beautiful Tweedsmuir, a place which I have revisited many times over the last twenty or so years and each time I do, I hope for ever more still water. I have yet to witness it though I have imagined it many, many times. I know what my perfect image of Talla and its pump-house look like; I’ve just never been able to capture it. Yet. This is a place which I have always known to be wonderfully picturesque, reassuringly tranquil and yet never easy to capture in two dimensions. It can take a good hour or more to get here from home and in an hour, Scottish weather can change a dozen times and so, no matter what you expect on the way, often – conditions can be far different when one finally arrives. Insosaying, I have learned not to expect or hope for ‘favourable’ conditions and instead, work with what I have; what I had on this day – was cloud, haze, and my three DPMs. I’ve said this before and I absolutely believe it, that the medium shouldn’t be the message… but when the medium is so good at getting the message across, it’s hard to ignore its importance. 

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I | Talla Reservoir & The Pump-House [DP3M]

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Sigma’s DP Merrills have accompanied me here once before – perhaps six or seven years ago and back in a time when I really don’t think I was photographically or artistically mature enough to truly appreciate them; what they truly offer. Things are different now. I have slowed down my approach to a point where I don’t care anymore that these little brick-like cameras take an absolute aeon to write even one image to card, or that the shutter-lag catches me out every single time I make a shot, or that its Foveon sensor can’t render well above ISO 400 (in black and white; for colour frames, 200 is the limit, especially if you’re making large prints). What I do love though, is how these little bricks capture immensely detailed frames without fuss or flourish, without scene modes, art filters or other awful, tacky, consumer-poaching gimmicks but with menus which are helpfully customisable and hence, are so ridiculously easy to quickly navigate. It’s got all I need to make a shot – and absolutely nothing more. Halle*******lujah! With the Holy Three in my bag, my shoulder barely knew they were even there. No changing lenses, no slow zooms, just perfectly matched primes and sensors that bite a chunk out of your arse when you’ve finally uploaded for edit. Hey, you have to forgive me – this is photo-blog after all! 

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II | Tweedsmuir Parish Church & a Sorrowful Stone [DP1M]

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Quite by accident, something else I have come to enjoy about the DPM series (and the DPs before them, I might add) is their unusual colour signature. Without going into too much science – the Foveon is made of three separate layers each capturing a different colour, from front to back – blue, green and red. This means that blue light hits the sensor first, and red, last. Naturally then, more red light is required than blue to register on the sensor (as it has to penetrate the blue and green layers first) and this is, as I understand it, why the Foveon’s captures look a little less warm than a standard, interpolated Bayer sensor would produce. Furthermore, I really like the look. Oddly then, for me – being predominantly a black and white photographer (and by the way, these things totally ROCK for monochrome!) that I should enjoy the Sigma’s colour output in the way that I currently am. I absolutely look forward to much better light where I can really find out just how much these tools can interpret what and how I see. Maybe one day soon I will get my wish and, my long-suffering and ever-faithful Bumble will be able to stop concentrating so hard at paying attention to my incessant wafflings and just, perhaps – enjoy a few more frames instead, over a nice cuppa. 

Which – I hope you also do. Thank you, as always – for reading! 

R.

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III | Cross-Over [DP2M]

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Old, Secluded Stone | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, full-spectrum, photography, ruins, rural, structures

The Temple of Cally Woods.


This one was another rare find… and again, I can’t take any credit! What can I say? Bumble finds ’em and I shoot ’em!

In 1779, a landscape gardener by the name of James Ramsay built this beautiful gothic ‘temple’ from which, at the time, fantastic views over Gatehouse and the open parkland of the Cally Estate could be breathtakingly enjoyed. Now, it stands hidden within the Cally Woods, a stone’s throw from the A75 yet, invisible from it. Surprisingly, however, it was found to be a mere two-minutes walk from a side-road – barely visible through the trees until we we almost upon it. Some work had been undertaken in around 2005 to restore this building and this was evident in some very obvious modern materials and techniques used, but its aura matches its era – and offered a very enjoyable half-hour for one particular gent. Oddly, its main facia and entrance to the south is identical to the west face, albeit that the doorway and windows on the west side are bricked up now. It seems a little odd and I wonder if Ramsay had changed his mind while building it or, perhaps, was it altered at some time in its future? One William Todd was a known resident here, for ten years, whilst he was in charge of drove cattle belonging to James Murray. I can’t imagine how cosy this place would have been with the open fire roaring. Of course, it would have had a roof, back then! 

I hope you’ll enjoy these few grabs and, thank you again for reading.

R.

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I | To the Trees [Ricoh GR III – VIS] | ISO:1600

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II | The South Entrance [Ricoh GR III – VIS] | ISO: 800

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III | The West Wall [Ricoh GR III- VIS] | ISO: 640

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IV | The South Entrance [Ricoh GXR – LTFS] | ISO: 673[!]

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V | Roofless [Ricoh GXR – LTFS] | ISO: 2810[!]
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GETTING OUT [AHEM!] – LESS | PT.III | 35CHRONICLE

35mm, black & white, fine art, infrared, landscape, photography, rural, skies, structures, waterscape

Cumbersome Ol’ Things!


So, here we are, at the last of my posts from the beautiful Sandyhills – one of the most gorgeous areas of coastline here in Dumfries & Galloway. From a freezing cold day on an empty beach, a glorious winter sun low in an ice-blue sky. You’d think by now that I’d be tempted to shoot in and, process for colour a lot more but no, I still can’t seem to ‘see’ in colour. These four captures were all made with my LTFS converted GXRs – I took them both, set-up for 720nm – in case one of them decided to freeze up on me (it’s happened before). I am happy to say that, though aging now (in camera technology terms) they still performed perfectly. Lest not that the medium become the message, I still have to remind myself that for some reason, I have never been able to ‘see’ quite so well with any other camera that I have ever shot with, than these cumbersome ol’ things. Perhaps I am a cumbersome ol’ thing, too, which may well be why we get along so perfectly. Slow, methodical, meticulous and as always – enjoying the moment. And here, with family, on a day like this, what else could possibly be quite so worth getting out of bed for? 

From the icicled ceiling of the Needle’s Eye and the frozen beaches of Southern Scotland, may I say, as always, thank you so much for reading, I do hope that you’ll enjoy these few grabs and – I wish you all a fabulous, safe and healthy weekend ahead. 

R.

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Getting Out [Ahem!] – Less | PT.I | 35Chronicle

35mm, 50mm, black & white, fine art, nature, photography, rural, skies, structures, waterscape

Romancing the Stone.


These frames are from our first visit to the small hamlet of Sandyhills, around a week ago. It was a little impromptu but the weather was fair and, as Stickola Nurgeon had promised the people of Scotland that despite the still current Tier 4 restrictions, we could indeed, still venture out for legitimate exercise without the fear of being questioned or arrested [hurrah and huzzah!] – so, Bumble and I hopped in the car and headed off for a stroll on the beach. I have been itching, you see, to get my 5D3 out into the open and put it through its paces a little (and a little is all it can get right now, obviously) so this was a perfect opportunity not only to get a little time in free air but also to, hopefully, snag a few frames. We’d been reading about this local-ish spot, famed for its caves and one particular arched rock, known as the Needles Eye (accessible only at low-tide) – the words ‘kid’ and ‘sweetshop’ leap to mind. But there’s a reason this is PT.I – you see, this place is so picturesque that we decided to visit again, later in the week and, we took the nippers on our sequel visit, under glorious low winter sun and blue skies; of course, this meant that I would give this place the IR treatment I so knew that it deserves (however, more on that in the next post). There’s a romance here that’s impossible to ignore. For now though, I do hope you will enjoy these captures from a beautiful part of Dumfries & Galloway’s coastline. Keep well, stay safe and thank you!

R.

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[All Frames: Canon 5D III | EF 24-105mm / f4]

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.