Views from a Ridge | Infrared | PT.I | 35:Chronicle

28mm, black & white, faux-colour, infrared, landscape, photography, waterscape

Talla & Megget.


We’ve all been there; you get all keyed up as a result of some half-awake, impossible-to-ignore inspiration to go out and make photographs for the entire day and, even before you have wiped the sleep from your eyes and  headed for the shower, (even though the BBC Weather app has predicted sun and very little cover that day) the clouds roll in, and before you know it, they’ve also unloaded their picnic baskets and laid down their blankets, for a day of it. Bugger. (When you’re intending on shooting for infrared, this is not the best of conditions). Still, you get ready, pack your gear in the car and, head off in salubrious hope that conditions will in fact improve. (They don’t.) Before you know it, you are over 30 miles from home, more than 15 miles along a single-track road, dodging sheep at 15 mph (if you’re lucky) and because you’re still full of that waking, resolute determination to find something, anything to shoot before you head home again, you’re a long way past the point of no return both on the road and, in your head. Then, out of the grey (that should be blue, but you can’t always have everything, can you?) you find yourself approaching scenes like these. Scenes that inspire, no matter what the elements deliver.

After I had cussed the clouds, I realised that I had simply decided to get inspired on a less than perfect day for my intentions. But we revolve around the elements; it’s never the other way around. Best to understand that and, get on with it. Or not. I chose the former.

It wasn’t such an imperfect day after all.

*

Talla Reservoir  & Farm | 28mm 760nm Infrared.

35chronicle.046 (3)

*

Megget Water (To the East, from the Dam, towards St.Mary’s Loch) | 28mm 760nm Infrared.

35chronicle.046 (1)

*

Megget Water | Looking West, from the Dam | 28mm 760nm Faux-Colour Infrared.

35chronicle.046 (2)

*

07th August 2018: See Take: 2 for the re-shoot under near-perfect weather conditions.

All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. 35chronicle@gmx.com Thank you for visiting & if you would like updates, please click Follow. All images are resized for publishing.
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
*

I Was Just Rummaging in my Drawers! | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, nature, photography, ug-11

Experiment: UG-11 – UV =  ∼650-1250nm IR.


For well over ten years, I have enjoyed playing around with different wavelengths in my personal photography, most notably, with infrared wavelengths between around 700 and 850nm. These two frames were captured with the only equipment I have currently, that is able to record IR wavelengths, but it’s not ideal for the job as such. They were captured using a UG-11 conversion.

*

I. | 35mm • ISO 1600 • Infrared w/UG-11

35chronicle.031 (1)

*

UG-11 blocks visible light from reaching the image sensor, allowing over 99% UV light transmission from around 235-410nm however, much less IR transmission from around 650-1250nm peaking at around only 30% transmission at close to 715nm. This makes UG-11 ideal for UV photography (think: flowers or forensic applications) but less ideal for IR shooting. Though there is no need for an IR filter to be mounted on to the front of the lens (because visible light is already being blocked) a simple UV filter is adequate in order to allow only IR wavelengths to pass. However, because the peak light-transmittance of IR wavelengths is only around 30% of a dedicated IR conversion, it does mean that unless one is happy to record their images at higher ISOs in order to shoot handheld, a tripod will still be required. (Shooting this configuration with a tripod at base ISO would render some fabulous cloud or water movement due to longer Tv necessities for accurate exposures, I would imagine.) Furthermore, good strong sunlight is a must if shooting (handheld) infrared in this way and, as I have discovered, duller daylight is far less forgiving when capturing IR with a UG-11 than it would be with a dedicated IR converted unit. 

I’m sure, not least because of my passion for alternative-wavelength photography, that I will be coming back to discuss this topic in a lot more depth in the future, but thought I’d share a couple of handheld frames captured recently with a 35mm UG-11 conversion that I rediscovered at the back of a drawer. I’m not sure I have a specific use for UV photography yet, but it’s fun to play around with possibilities, nonetheless.

This is just a little frippery so please, don’t judge me on composition.

Enjoy!

*

II. | 35mm • ISO 800 • Infrared w/UG-11

35chronicle.031 (2)

*

As always, thank you for visiting & if you would like updates, please click Follow. All images are resized for publishing.
HOME
A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS

All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. 35chronicle@gmx.com
Thank you.