Cabin-Fever, Diversionary Tactics & Silver Linings | 35Chronicle

black & white, photography, rural, structures

Durisdeer Church.


With non-essential travel still restricted here in Scotland, I have read nowhere that once a journey becomes essential – that there are restrictions upon the route one should take to make it. Obviously I would not decide to travel an overly excessive distance to make any trip but, I did make a choice to take us off the beaten track when it came to a well-timed dental appointment last week. Every cloud… as they say. Heading ‘roughly’ in the direction intended, instead of taking a main trunk road there, I though that it would be nice to drive the longer, more rural and leisurely route through vast hills, taking in views from above and below the low clouds that floated between them. The ever present mist and fog had ensured that the air remained damp and cold, and even so, it was nice to be outside the house for what was the first time in many weeks. Home is and should always be the heart of life and yet, the space outside can be a new-born revelation when cabin-fever has taken such a firm hold. We were glad, probably for the first time – that the reason we were taking in a little scenery was due to a visit to the dentist. Who’d have thunk it?!

On the way, we made just one stop – in the tiny hamlet of Durisdeer to take a look at the local church; a quick leg-stretch if you like and one that enabled me to grab these few shots with my 5D III. (It’s a recent addition to my bag and I’ve had nowhere near enough time with it – after all, there are only so many shots of busy coffee tables, indoor plants, studious children or – the pooch, that anybody could take and, I would not wish to over-indulge you with family portraits!) These are the first frames I have snagged here and I really do want to go back with my infrared gear too – reminds me a little of the ruined church at Hoddom Cross that I shot a couple of years back. Definitely a trip for the (hopefully) near future once all of this madness is under control. 

I hope you’ll enjoy these few captures and, are staying safe and well.

R.

*
I.

35chronicle.254 (1)

*
II.

35chronicle.254 (2)

*
III.

35chronicle.254 (3)

[All Frames: Canon 5D III | EF 24-105mm / f4]

HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Show Me a Sign | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, landscape, photography, ruins

The Crossing.


My fascination with old ruins and cemeteries has nothing at all to do with religion (take that any way you will) – but has in truth, everything to do with the fact that such subjects, in the right light, can make beautiful topics for black and white photographs and what’s more, 35 is perfect for this kind of caper. That’s why, on my way home from work on Sunday morning, I stopped at The Cross to photograph this ol’ church (upon which, the local council, as well as boarding-up most of the gorgeous arched windows (sigh!) has thoughtfully mounted a bold blue & white sign reporting that “This Building is in Ruin…”, (as though it were not obvious) and words to the effect that “All Ye Who Enter, Beware of Death!”  Nonetheless, it get’s them off the hook I s’ppose and, seeing as how everything has to be so obviously safety-netted in this age, largely I presume for the terminally unaware hence, and more importantly, local authority backsides well and truly covered, it’s no surprise that it’s there. But it is a shame that someone felt the need to point out the (bleedin’) obvious and in so doing deface this Gothic gem. Still, the sign is on the north side and the sun was already rising in an almost cloudless sky in the east – I could navigate around it. The graveyard itself has three Georgian burial enclosures where are interred both civilian deceased and many, even more sobering war-graves.  

*

I.

35chronicle.025 (3)

*

The truth is, the fact that I only live up the road from this Gothic ruin means that I have driven past it more times that I could possibly imagine and, have always meant to stop and capture it when the light’s been suitable – and when it has been, my cameras have been at home. That said, I have taken to leaving them in the car when I’m out and about, I mean, what’s the point leaving the things anywhere else? As I drove home, I pulled up outside and took a wander around it, absorbed the morning’s early sunshine and grabbed a few frames of the old place before continuing on my way home for some much needed shut-eye.

This church (built in 1817) has been in this ruined state since a fire rendered it roofless in 1975, when-abouts the alter was removed (presumably by the Church or maybe persons unknown?) the grass though, is still maintained around the war-graves and the air of the place, especially when wandering around alone on a beautiful early Sunday morning, is one of the most peaceful imaginable. I only hope that this comes across even just a little, in these frames. 

*

II.

35chronicle.025 (1)

*

III.

35chronicle.025 (2)

*

IV.

35chronicle.025 (4)

*

As always, thank you for visiting & if you would like updates, please click Follow. All images are resized for publishing.
HOME
A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS

All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. 35chronicle@gmx.com
Thank you.

A Life & Death Contrast | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, photography, spring, sunset

Pirate Graves | Beneath, Between & Behind.


Whilst I love the coming of spring and, all of the wondrous new life that emerges with it, I seem also, conversely, perhaps even perversely, to have a little bit of a fascination for graveyards, church ruins, and dare I say it, possibly too, death. It’s not a consuming passion you must understand; perhaps more – they are simply notions of enquiry, empathy and a tinge of metaphysical intrigue. In a crude way, such intrigue was piqued a few evenings ago when I took a short after-dinner walk along the river, just before sunset, to the nearby site of a very old church, some three-hundred or so years past, the remains of which are now completely gone. What remains on the site, however, are around four or five dozen headstones and burial plots. With my camera in my pocket, I took a very leisurely but intent look at the stones and markers whilst enjoying the sound of the river and the golden, still warming shimmer from the setting sun behind me. On such an evening as this, my shutter-finger itches a little more than usual and it’s all I can do to keep my hand from reaching for my camera. Still, sometimes I prefer to take my time and just ponder, to look and take in – when the light is almost certain to not imminently disappear, that is. It was one of these kinds of evenings.

*

I. Iron, Stone & Wood.

35chronicle.018 (4)

*

II. In Memory.

35chronicle.018 (1)

*

One of the general giveaways as to the potential wealth (or debt) of the departed and their immediate family, can often be perceived from the size, design and material and, wordage contained within their plot and, of their stone or marker. With this realisation in mind, you may be able to imagine my intrigue when, upon not too intense perusal, I discovered that the locally called ‘Pirate Graves’ actually existed – with no markings, barring the obvious emblem of the skull and crossed-bones and little to nothing else that might identify he or she below. They lay between areas filled with the stones of seemingly important people of their time (mostly from around the early 18th Century) and, this befuddled me somewhat. As I was unable to find any indications as to the years of burial on these so-called Pirate stones, I have no idea as to whether they are older than the stones marking the spots of the more affluent, or not.

*

III. Skull-[un]-duggery?

35chronicle.018 (3)

*

Some part of me cannot wholly accept that there were or are actual pirates buried here. Perhaps instead, there were stylistic and symbolistic changes after the Reformation and I would need to research this in much more depth. Their crudeness certainly seems to suggest a lack of patterning or stone-masonry skill. Perhaps too, they simply weren’t regarded all that highly and the skull and crossbones was their final judgement and the badge which they would wear for the rest of their eternities?

Nonetheless, all of these graves exist to intrigue, if no-one else, me – not only by their seemingly obvious socially contrasting proximity to one another but also for the fact that nothing (short of an exhumation), will ever be able to reveal anything about who the unnamed, were

*

IV. Beneath, Between & Behind.

35chronicle.018 (2)

*

As always, thank you for visiting & if you would like updates, please click Follow. All images are resized for publishing.
HOME
A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS

All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. 35chronicle@gmx.com
Thank you.

*