Ribblehead Viaduct: PT.II | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, fine art, infrared, landscape, nature, photography, rural, structures, summer

Look Back, Before You Leave.


When arriving here at the viaduct, it’s so easy to forget to look around at the landscape. It really is that jaw-dropping. If I was a walker (as in, a keen rambler) I would have already known the name of the flat-top hill behind us as Pen-Y-Ghent, one of the Three Peaks so popular with enthusiasts. Suffice to say, though, I love this landscape so much that I am even thinking about a trip here for a few days, after a visit to a reputable outdoor clothing shop! 

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Thank you all for your clicks and kind thoughts and comments and, I do hope you’ll enjoy these last few IR frames from Batty Moss! 

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– Memento Vivere! – 
R.
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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.

Ribblehead Viaduct: PT.I/II | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle Photography

black & white, infrared, landscape, photography, ruins, rural, structures

An Ode to ‘Batty Moss’.


We ended up here by a kind of accident, really. So far off the beaten track and so far from home, you’d be excused for questioning such a statement. But I’d listed a camera outfit on a popular sales app and ended up meeting the buyer (Hi, George – if you’re reading!) down the road in Cumbria. We simply decided to make a day of it and take the RF for a bit more of a spin. A glorious, hot day, stunning views – roof down; it was as perfect a day for a run as any I can ever remember.

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Ribblehead, or Batty Moss Viaduct at Ribblehead in North Yorkshire is, as you might imagine, strewn with history – both good and bad. Work commenced on the foundations in 1870 and through re-design issues and financial problems, the final key-stone wasn’t placed until the end of 1874. It was opened as a single-track line in 1876 and despite many attempts to close the line as early as the 1980s, it remains open today as a result of increasing passenger numbers on the Settle to Carlisle line and, huge petitions to save it. During the construction of the viaduct, some one-hundred or so of the two-thousand (plus) workforce died either as a result of construction related injuries, fights or – smallpox. The land around the viaduct itself is now a scheduled ancient monument as the remains of the three settlements and construction camps (Batty Wife Hole, Sebastapol and Belgravia) are situated here. Its architect was the renowned John Sydney Crossley who died some three years after the line opened to the public.

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During our visit to the viaduct, I did my best to compose to exclude the scores of cars and smoking BBQs below many of the twenty-four arches and humming drones above them; this place is an absolute magnet when the sun’s out! As with most things in life though, patience is a virtue and occasionally I was able to get clear views of this magnificent structure. An absolute treat.

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I hope you’ll have enjoyed these first few frames and I wish you all a fabulous week.

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– Memento Vivere! – 
R.
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HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © Rob Lowe | 35Chronicle Photography  (2018-2021) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.