An Alternative ‘Scott’s View’ – Melrose | 35Chronicle

35mm, 50mm, autumn / fall, black & white, history, infrared, landscape, nature, photography, rural, trees

The Site of Trimontium: A Trilogy.


A single day’s journey into the Scottish Borders last week had us purposefully perusing local maps for all of the sights we’d hoped to visit – while the threatening weather remained (mostly) on our side. One of the day’s most anticipated sites was here, at the renowned and history-steeped Scott’s View – Sir Walter Scott’s favourite view out to the triple-peaked Eildon Hills. At over 420m in height they look out to Teviotdale to the south and the northernmost peak has been discovered to be covered in over 5km of ramparts which enclose an area of around 40 acres within which at least 300 level platforms have been formed within the rock itself in order to have provided bases for houses. It is believed that the site was occupied as far back as 1000BC. During the 1st Century CE (common era) – the Romans had erected the huge fort of Trimontium of Newstead (named after the three peaks) at the foot of the hill on the bank of the River Tweed. As sights go – they don’t get a lot better than this on such a glorious day.

The hollow (as legends would have it) hills are actually marilyns and are steeped in folklore, as well as history, as the words of ‘Thomas the Rhymer’ would attest. Formed by the upward push of an underground volcano around 300m years ago, they were cleft in three by the magician Michael Scot as written by Walter Scott in his poem ‘The Lay of the Last Minstrel’, in 1805. With all this said, however, words alone cannot describe the feeling when standing at this spot and looking out at all of… this.

As most captures from up here would depict a very similar view with my standard set-ups, I decided to do things a little differently. The lens-ball treatment was a huge amount of fun and, I could never have left this scene without having grabbed an IR frame or two as well. (If you have been reading my pages for a while now, you’ll know this already, I guess).  Thank you so much for reading and have a great weekend, all!

R.

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[Equip: X100-IR & X100s w/50mm TCL]

I | Through the Ball – 50mm.

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II | 720nm Infrared – 35mm.

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III | The Magic of a Fair Maiden’s Hand.

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The Rat was a bit of an Unexpected Sight… | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, cityscapes, infrared, photography, structures

Chester: An Impromptu Jaunt in Infrared.

Ten days ago, we were on the road to Chester for a (kind of) mad-dash visit which, I am sure, will be of no huge interest to anyone reading this now, however, arriving early(ish) on the Sunday meant that we could take a walk around the city and see a few sights before the rigours of the impending Monday would find us somewhere between A and B or, B and D or – even C and F! You get the idea. It had been a good thirty-plus years since I had seen Chester and still I thought I would remember a few landmarks; yet – I remembered barely anything of the place at all. That is pretty odd for me because I am not in the habit of forgetting much and I was certain that I would at least remember something.  But no. On the plus side, however – I was seeing the place with fresh eyes, undistracted by memories (or the distinct lack of) and this alone made the city centre a bit of a playground for me, because, under beautiful sunshine (though periodically a little bit on the harsh side) I was able to grab some pleasing IR frames between coffees, doughnuts and, well – other indulgent diversions. I do have a few more captures to post in the near future but for now, I invite you to find Basil the Rat! It shouldn’t be too difficult – but I did have a chuckle when I saw it once I had got down to the editing stage. 

I do hope that you’ll enjoy these few captures and, that you’re having a great week. 

R.

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I | Chester Town Hall [720nm IR | 35mm]

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II | Desperately Seeking Basil [720nm IR | 35mm]

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III | Queen Victoria Clock Tower [720nm IR | 35mm]

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Closer Still(s) | PT.XXX | Sunflower [II] | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, colour, macro, nature, photography

Not My Usual Caper…

Seeing as how I rarely shoot or, process for colour – it was a lot of fun the other day to make a few more frames with the GR III  which is, in my opinion a black and white gem of a camera. Marketed, written about and most often thought of as a street camera, I have been shooting close-ups and macros with the GR line for years. My last post (a giant sunflower shot at 720nm IR) was made on my old, converted Fujifilm X100  but these three frames were in fact made on the GR III, believe it or not – albeit in my favoured 35mm crop mode. They were handheld shots (I had little time to set up the tripod, I’m sorry) and because the light was so appealing, I decided to leave a couple of frames in colour. I wrote a long time ago about how I only usually think in terms of colour when the colour itself is the reason why I make the images in the first place and, my intentions were the very same when I made these. This GR’s lens focuses a lot closer in macro-mode than the first two iterations of the camera and I’m pretty sure I could have got even nearer to my points of interest but, that would have ruined my framing. Close-up parallax during focusing sometimes makes it tricky especially when shooting with a wider lens, even when having moved the focus-point beforehand but as you can see here, it does a fine job. 

I do hope you’ll enjoy these few frames. Have a great weekend, all! 

R.

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Closer Still(s) | PT.XXIX | Sunflower – 720nm IR | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, macro, nature, photography

Looking Up!


Fujifilm X100 – IR Conversion | 35mm
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Bridging Gaps [with the GR III] | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, Long Exposure, night / low-light, photography, structures, waterscape

If I Take Just One Camera…


I | Devorgilla Bridge [Long Exposure]

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II | Suspension Bridge Over the Nith.

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III | The Caul & Devorgilla Bridge [Long Exposure]

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U-Turns | Ricoh GR III | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, fine art, Indoor, macro, photography

I Know! I Said I Wouldn’t Do It…

Back in March 2019 I wrote a post about the (in my view, amazing) Ricoh GR entitled ‘You Can Call Me – Jack’ (post #121 from my archives page, if you’re interested) in which I wrote: “If the GR III is as good as it’s going to get, then I’m sorry Ricoh- you already got it bang-on with the first one – nuts, bolts, the lot. And I’m not moving. I mean, what would be the point?” Okay, so I have had the GR III for a few months now and whilst all the reviews are out there – I’m not about to write another one; not yet anyway. (I have a very early start tomorrow. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it!) What I will do now, though, is just post a couple of macro / close-up frames of another of my favourite things and, let the images do the talking. I love how the GR line just gets better and better. I hope you’ll enjoy this little smidgen of self-indulgence. I have never found a camera so good at macro as the GR series and the III gets even closer than the I/II. All frames were shot using my favoured 35mm internal-crop mode and I didn’t even need my Hoya +10 for these… blows my mind!

Have a great week, all!

R.

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Dundrennan Abbey | 720nm IR – PT.III | 35Chronicle

black & white, history, infrared, photography, ruins, rural, structures

I Really, Really Can’t Help It!

Way back in April of last year, I wrote what was to be my first post on Dundrennan Abbey. It was certainly not the first time I have shot here for, I have been revisiting this beautiful ruin for almost twenty years. It has a draw that very few other places can illicit quite in the way that it does and, seeing as how I keep my cameras with me whenever I’m on any kind of road-trip, well – it stands to reason that if ever I am near the place and I have time to stop, I invariably do. I don’t always get lucky with the light but seeing as how I have shot here over a dozen times or so, I have a very pleasing stash of visible light and infrared captures. Each time, I try to see different angles of the abbey, capture something different and – this can be quite a challenge because revisiting somewhere, anywhere, multiple times in order to shoot can lead to a bit of muscle-memory taking over, trying to catch again those favourite angles only – better, this time. I sometimes have to try very hard to stop myself from doing this. Nonetheless, I also believe in shooting every angle possible while on location and, edit hard when I get to the upload at home. This little shoot was a tad different though. I have started to be more selective when it comes to the work of my shutter-finger. If I don’t ‘see’ it, I don’t shoot it anymore. If I see the frame and it’s not working for me, no matter what the balance between positive and negative elements, the camera will mostly stay in my bag nowadays. With that said, these frames came pretty naturally and while I did repeat a few past shots, these are (to my mind) a little more mature and pleasing. On this occasion, well over a year since my last visit, the grounds are now extremely overgrown; the result of a pandemic which as yet displays no signs of abating to the point of disappearing and so, much is left to wither. The lack of maintenance here at Dundrennan, however, only amplifies its historical and physical authenticity from a visual perspective – and despite the hard work put in under normal circumstances to maintain these grounds and this stunning structure, I rather prefer the look it has now that nobody has touched it since our own lockdown commenced.

On a much different note: I notice now that my followers have surpassed 300 here on 35Chronicle Photography and I cannot let this go without saying a massive thank you to each and every one of you who follow my pages, and also, to the many of you who don’t follow yet return to read and peruse my words and images. I started this blog back in early 2018 and when there is so much competition (for want of a better word) for people’s time and consideration, I do feel that with this amount of followers and over 22,000 views to date – I have a lot to be very grateful for. To all of you, from the bottom of my heart, Thank You All!

Just lately I have been extremely busy with prints so it has taken me a little longer to getting round to posting, this week. I do hope though, that you will enjoy the following few frames as much as I do. Thank you so much for reading.

R.

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[All frames captured with Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion w/Hoya R72]

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Carnsalloch House, Kirkton | 35Chronicle

black & white, full-spectrum, photography, ruins, rural, structures

Black & White Heaven | A Full-Spectrum Photographic Adventure.


14th August 2020.

It all started with a half-hearted faff-around on the web, looking for some more interesting, old and abandoned places nearby worthy of a visit and, a photo-sesh. I’ve taken my cameras to so many wonderful old and [seemingly] forgotten places over the past many years that I might well at some point have thought that I may have ticked off a good many of them but still, I love to be proved wrong and, surprised. Last week, I got another such surprise when Bumble stumbled upon a short article about Carnsalloch House, near Kirkton. Passing me her ‘phone, she asked, “How about this old place? It’s not far, either!” I took a look and, feeling that familiar pang of excitement, a huge smile now lay wide across my face. Tomorrow, we would go. The BBC weather app was called to duty and, the day was consigned.

Not even two weeks prior, I had sent off a couple of A16 lens units for my trusty GXR outfit, to my good and clever friend, Amar. One was for a simple sensor clean and, the other for another LTFS [full-spectrum] conversion. Only a few days later they arrived back and, I was extremely keen to put them both through their paces again – dedicating one for LTFS [UV + VIS + IR] shooting and, the other for 720nm IR; this would save me swapping out mounted lens filters as the light changed. I know too that Amar is very keen to see results from his labours and, who can blame him? With that said, all of the frames I will be sharing over this series were shot on both units and, with nothing else. Anyhooz, back to Carnsalloch House…

The Old Stable Building:

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:1467 | VIS.

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24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:209 | LTFS.

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When we arrived at first, we thought we’d found the house. Poking around outside and comparing the few shots we’d found on the ‘net had us befuddled and actually scratching our heads because the shots definitely didn’t correspond to the building we had arrived at. It was certainly a grand building but there were too many differences to ignore. This wasn’t the place. Still, it was worth a good look and so we carefully found an easy way inside. After a quick look around, it was clear to see from the original ceiling height, the sheer cubic footage of each room and the huge arched entry doors front and rear that we were actually inside the old stable building. The Austin Maestro ‘Tandy’ van (made between 1982 and 1995) that stood just as derelict as the building itself, looked no bigger than a child’s toy in here. Vandals have visited and, revisited over the years – fires have been set and spray cans have been emptied and this once, clearly magnificent building, now lies in complete ruin with no hope of rescue. After an hour or so, with the afternoon moving steadily on, we decided to look for the locally famous crypt. Quite how many know of it is unknown to me but there are very few images to discover online and, in true fashion, I decided that I wanted to change that. What I had seen of it had me feeling very edgy, and keen to push on and – find it. Looking around the old Johnston Estate, we followed what appeared to be a promising trail to where we believed it might have been an ideal place to build such a thing. Only a five minute walk from the old stable building, we came across the instantly recognisable Carnsalloch House.

28mm | 1/125th | f6.8 | ISO:591 | LTFS.

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28mm | 1/125th | f6.8 | ISO:351 | LTFS.

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Carnsalloch House:

24mm | 1/500th | f8 | ISO:200 | LTFS.

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The house has been empty since 2000 or thereabouts and since then, it too has been the target of arsonists and vandals. Built in 1759 (there is a stone depicting this on the outside wall of the north wing) Carnsalloch was once a palladian two-storey mansion house; an A-listed building (as of May 1959) that first belonged to Alexander Johnston[e] of Carnsalloch – a London chemist. Along its timeline, the house has had many extensions built (and destroyed by fire) and, for its latter years since 1960 it was run by the Leonard Cheshire Foundation (a UK health and welfare charity). It is reportedly the most haunted house in Scotland and has even raised questions and concerns about the sighting of ‘the ghost of’ a Great Dane – standing at a first floor window to the east of the pillared entrance. Believe what you will, but there are those who have wandered the area with dog treats in hand, hoping to find the pooch and, lure it to safety. I have no idea as to whether the canine (apparition or not) was ever located or indeed, seen again. Suffice to say, we met nor encountered no Grey Lady, or a seemingly semi-see-through Scooby-Doo! Largely, due to the extensive damage and vandalism, this once gorgeous building was not so much of a treat to walk around as we would have hoped. Entry on our part would have been extremely dangerous (and probably quite stupid, too) and so, we took a look only around the outer building itself. The weather too was closing in a tad and after just a few frames, we headed back to the car for a re-group. It was time again to re-consult the oracle. We just had to find the crypt.

The Johnston[e] Chapel & Crypt:

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:591 | LTFS.

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It was almost impossible to find any useful information about the Crypt. Nothing we could find could tell us where the heck it was situated but one search made us think that it could be in the vicinity of Kirkton Kirk itself. Time was still on our side (just) and so, we set off again. Barely a mile on, we stopped and looked around the church, looking for signs and familiar landscapes from images we’d found that would point us in the right direction. Nothing. We scratched our heads again and, while I was checking my batteries and cards, Bumble showed me her ‘phone again. I was now looking at a small map of Cemetery Wood. There was a red pointer marked only some fifty yards from the road out of Kirkton. We excitedly spun around again.

The light was fading as the clouds moved in and, seemingly there was nowhere to stop anywhere near the wood. Checking the road behind, between the bends as we approached the sharp left near the entrance to the wood itself, Bumble spied the small patch of ground just off the road and right around the bend and made straight for it. Parked. Now to find the crypt. Climbing over the gate, eyes peeled – no sign. Observing the light under densely foliaged and closely-neighboured trees I was beginning to worry that even if we found the crypt, I’d have little useful light under which to shoot it. Certainly IR was not going to be a choice. We walked towards a high mound and there, through the murk, was the corner outline of what was clearly a beautiful and ornate stone structure. We hurried forward and climbed the earthy slope. Stood right in front of us – was the crypt.

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:436 | LTFS.

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Out of interest, one of the shots I’d seen on the web (of the Johnston[e] Crypt) was in fact an IR shot, taken by someone on a converted Nikon pocket camera of some sort. A slight hint of jealousy that someone had stolen a little thunder from me, sure – but, whimsical and no more. I was determined to capture this place reflecting its mood and setting. LTFS turned out to be absolutely perfect for this part of the trip due to the light conditions and, it enabled me to capture wavelengths impossible to do so with any of my visible light set-ups, thus keeping my Tv higher and ISO lower than usual. The frames of the crypt may have you realising that I was back in hog-heaven and, you’d be right. I was beside myself. The chapel and crypt were built in around 1850 and, have also suffered multiple break-ins, vandalism, roof damage due to a fallen tree – gables and ornate roof stones scatter the ground around it and as resting place, it has been desecrated horrendously. Seeing it, taking it all in just for what it is now – renders a feeling of noticeable sadness. But to be able to capture it like this – I am almost speechless now. I am still stunned that we even found it. Rather, I didn’t! It’s okay though.

24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:295 | LTFS.

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24mm | 1/125th | f6.3 | ISO:766 | LTFS.

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It was my intention to post a few images at a time and over a few posts – you know, break it up a little bit? I never like to over-indulge or test a reader’s resolve or patience. Ever. But for some reason, I just want to get these frames out there. A little bit of a back-story, perhaps but without the means to yet find out more about Carnsalloch – this is the best I can do right now. I do hope that you’ve enjoyed these frames. They have been extremely pleasurable to make and mean a little more to me than some of my other works. If you have stuck with me through all of this – wow; and… thank you!

In closing this one, I would like to thank Amar for yet again creating for me another wonderful piece of technology – my leading eye is very fortunate, my friend. I remain in black and white Nirvana! Thank you, my friend!

To the R&D and marketing peeps at Pentax Ricoh – thank you for making what Ricoh must have believed was a bit of a mistake at the time – poppycock! This thing rocks – still!

Of course, equally, to my bestie and lifetime sidekick, Bumble – who seems to have as much passion for what I do as I do. Now there’s a rarity and one worth looking after. Cheers darlin’!

R.
24mm | 1/125th | f5.9 | ISO:456 | LTFS.

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In Contrast: Two Lighthouses | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle

35mm, black & white, boats, infrared, photography, rural, skies, structures, summer, waterscape

Some Overdue IR Fun with the X100.


It’s been a good long while since I took my IR converted X100 out for a spin – preferring usually, the utter versatility of my wonderful GXR A16 full-spectrum conversions instead. However, every now and then, when the conditions are just right, it’s wonderful to travel a little lighter still and restrict myself to just one focal-length; it avoids all the choice and confusion over which FL I’m going to shoot with and allows me to just – make pictures. Compose, frame – capture. If there is one thing I love about the X100 series, it is simply that. It just doesn’t get in the way. At all. So, after a jaunt to the Mull of Galloway and then up through Port Logan, travelling as (camera) light as I believe it is possible to do so, here are a couple of rather pleasing frames that, I do hope that you’ll enjoy too.


Port Logan Lighthouse | X100 [720nm Internal Conversion] | 35mm – 1/220th – f8 – ISO:200

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Mull of Galloway Lighthouse [as a Smoking Chimney, Perhaps?] | X100 [720nm Internal Conversion] | 35mm – 1/420th – f8 – ISO:400

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Big Water of Fleet Viaduct | 720nm Infrared | 35Chronicle

28mm, black & white, infrared, landscape, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures

To the Missing Four Arches


This post is written with huge thanks to my good friend, Amar Verma at vermatec – for, I have not only my original GXR A16 LTFS conversion back in the bag, its sensor beautifully clean of all the dust spots I’ve been hoovering up with it but also, my spare A16 which is now also converted to LTFS and ready for some more of the same alternative wavelength caperings. I plan soon to delve into some shorter frequency IR work again, possibly as high as around 900nm which I will shoot alongside my currently favoured 720nm. Here’s a frame from the newly converted lens unit at 720nm. (Sadly, thanks to an inconsiderately parked Citroen camper-van, the four arches (of the twenty in total) to right of the frame were certainly obscured enough that they couldn’t be included here; never mind – another visit shouldn’t be too far away!) I hope that you’ll enjoy this one, nonetheless. And to Amar – thank you again, my friend. This one is just perfect!

R.


Sixteen Arches | GXR A16 LTFS 720nm IR | 28mm – 1/320th – f7.6 – ISO:200

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Loch Ettrick | 720nm IR [Long Expo’] – PT.I | 35Chronicle

black & white, boats, infrared, landscape, Long Exposure, nature, photography, rural, skies, summer, trees, waterscape

“Today, the Weather Will Consist Mainly of Horse-Flies, Cloud, Kayaking Intruders & Occasional, Infrequent Outbreaks of Sunshine”. (That’ll Do!)


I’m really struggling to find time enough to sit and write, lately. You may or may not have noticed and perhaps, it’s a nice change for readers to not have to feel guilty for all the ‘scanning’ we have to do when we do our best to keep up with all of the posts we follow and digest, in a meaningful way. A way that does justice to the incredible quality of works that are so regularly posted. Well, today, I have to write. I’m sorry. But I am starting to feel that distancing of connection with what I love to do so much and that which often lends context, most acutely comes down to words. Sometimes a frame by itself cannot be its own justification. This one almost achieves that, for me – but only because I was there shooting it. Still, my sub-header pretty much covers it. What it doesn’t portray, however, are the little yet frequent internal struggles I am having to do something a little different with my cameras. Ideas that have been explored and exploited for as long as any of us can remember are thus, still a little new to me and, as confident as I am at many genres of photography, long exposures still make me scratch my head as to how best to go about it. In this case, as with the previous recent frames that I have posted, I am winging it. Timing as best I can to achieve good exposure and some decent movement within the frame where it can move the eye and the mind. But slow-moving clouds are still just that, even over the course of a minute with the shutter open and so, we come to the water to hopefully save the day. The water came through in fine style. 

For years I have marvelled at the talents of photographers who have taken long-exposure photography to ever new heights and, whilst in no way could I hope to emulate some of the most incredible work that I have had the good fortune to view, I hope at the very least to be able to grasp the concept with the little knowledge that I do have and, put it to the test in making some frames of my own. Here, at the Loch-side, I was granted a gift, when eight year-old Flynn, on his first outing in a Kayak since he was four years old, drifted slowly into my frame. I made no attempt to ward him away (he was having so much fun, bless ‘im!) and, as I view the shot, I am bloody glad that I didn’t and, that he did. If only the shutter had remained open for another few seconds though? Nonetheless, happy accidents win the day and I have a frame to be delighted with. 


Loch Ettrick [I] | 720nm IR w/Hoya R72 & 10-Stop ND | Ricoh GXR A16 LTFS Conversion | 24mm – 60” – f22 – ISO:100.

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Although I am all too aware that conditions on this day weren’t perfect for this kind of exploration, I intend to keep going and will take my camera with me whenever and wherever I can in the hope that I will discover for myself, what to look out for and how to play with it. In the meantime, the cleg bites on my shoulders are reducing nicely and I can smile at great memories. I hope you’ll enjoy this one and, that you’ll have a great week ahead. 

R.


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GELSTON CASTLE – PT.IV | 35CHRONICLE

28mm, black & white, infrared, landscape, Long Exposure, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures

Revisiting Old Haunts – PT.V | 720nm Infrared – Long Exposure Series.


All About the Angles | 720nm IR w/Hoya R72 & 10-Stop ND | Ricoh GXR LTFS Conversion | 28mm – 60” – f22 – ISO:100.

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
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@35chroniclephotography
R.
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Orchardton Tower – PT.II | 35Chronicle

black & white, infrared, landscape, Long Exposure, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures

Revisiting Old Haunts – PT.IV | 720nm Infrared – Long Exposure Series.


Cloudburst at Orchardton Tower, Palnackie | 720nm IR w/ Hoya R72 & 10Stop ND | Ricoh GXR LTFS Conversion | 24mm – 60secs – f22.0 – ISO:100.

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[PT.I: Here | Post: 135]

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
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@35chroniclephotography
R.
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The Lighthouse at Southerness – PT.II | 35Chronicle

black & white, fine art, infrared, landscape, Long Exposure, photography, rural, skies, structures, summer

Revisiting Old Haunts – PT.II | 720nm Infrared – Long Exposure Series.


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Southerness Lighthouse | 720nm IR w/ Hoya R72 & 10Stop ND | Ricoh GXR LTFS Conversion | 24mm – 60secs – f22.0 – ISO:100.

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
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@35chroniclephotography
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Gelston Castle – PT.III | 35Chronicle

black & white, infrared, Long Exposure, photography, ruins, rural, skies, structures, summer

Revisiting Old Haunts – PT.I | 720nm Infrared – Long Exposure Series.


The spring of last year was a tremendously difficult time for me and, for those closest to me I think it must have been even harder. After a crazy-serious accident at work that rendered me flat on my back for almost twelve weeks due to multiple spinal and rib fractures, I absolutely needed to get out with my cameras again. For almost nine months afterwards and in so many ways, my entire being was in recovery-mode and eventually, even on crutches, I was able to make short trips out for the specific purpose of bagging even a few more frames – of all the things that made me feel whole and normal again, this was it. Barmy, don’t you think? Not long before that, though (and I think that this was a presiding reason for my increasing restlessness) – I had the amazingly good fortune to visit some truly beautiful places and one one of them was here, at the utterly stunning ruin of Gelston Castle, just a few miles from Castle Douglas. (My first post on Gelston is here, if you’d like to check it out). Oddly, for me, a second summer on-the-bounce has seen me confined (like almost everyone else lately) to quarters. My shutter finger gets very itchy when I know that I don’t have the freedom to exercise it and so, you can possibly imagine my joy when, just yesterday, Bumble and I visited Gelston again. This time, I wanted to do things a little differently and so, rather than just walk around for a half hour bagging IR shots that I probably have already snagged, the Big-Stopper came out of the bag and for once, I stopped being a lazy-arse, and brought the tripod along – probably for the first time in a lot of years. Here then, is one of yesterday’s frames from Gelston Castle – from the rear entrance to the ruin (that I would never have been able to get last year anyway, due to the sun being on the opposite side of the building once we’d arrived) and, whilst I would love to post a couple more right here, sadly, I’m still catching up on edits; soon, though.  

I do hope that you’ll enjoy this first frame, from what is for me a little bit of a different approach, though to many, not new at all, I am sure. Nonetheless, I hope it measures up. 

For now – thank you as always for visiting and, if this is your caper, I hope you’ll watch this space.

R.

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Gelston Castle Ruins – Rear Elevation | 720nm IR w/ Hoya R72 & 10Stop ND | Ricoh GXR LTFS Conversion | 24mm – 60secs – f18.0 – ISO:100.

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If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018-2020) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided. All images are resized prior to posting.
Feel free to join me on Instagram (click below) and, thank you for visiting.
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